Meld
Stardate: Unknown
Original Airdate: February 5, 1996

[Holodeck - Sandrine's]

KIM: Game.
PARIS: Why don't we make it interesting this time. Let's add some table stakes.
KIM: What kind of stakes?
PARIS: I don't know. Hmm. Couple of replicator rations, maybe?
RICKY: Don't do it, Harry. He's hustling you.
KIM: Wait a minute. Are you saying he deliberately let me win?
PARIS: That would be dishonest, Harry.
KIM: I won that game, and I'll beat you again.
PARIS: How many rations are you willing to bet on that?
CREWMEMBERS: Go for it, Harry.
KIM: A week's worth.
PARIS: Harry, Harry, Harry. Never, ever play with anyone, not even your best friend, if he says let's make it interesting. You want a little action, I'll give you a little action. How about an honest game of chance?
RICKY: Never play with anyone, even your best friend, if he offers you an honest game of chance, Harry.
PARIS: One replicator ration is all it takes to play, and the only thing you have to do to win is pick a number. Just predict what the radiogenic particle count will be at twelve hundred hours tomorrow, and if you hit the pot is yours. Minus a small handling fee for the bank, of course.
CREWMAN: I'll take a piece of that.
JONES: Jones. PARIS: Harry, get a PADD, take down these names and numbers.
KIM: I'm in too.
LEWIS: Lewis, twenty one hundred.

[Engineering]

TORRES: Ensign Hogan, still no luck with the warp drive?
HOGAN: No, Lieutenant. The manifold just won't fire up. We've finally narrowed it down to some kind of a problem in EPS conduit one four one.
TORRES: Was there any indication yesterday that there was something wrong?
HOGAN: Suder was monitoring the EPS flow and the CCF. He says everything was fine.
TORRES: I guess we'll just have to get in there and track it down.

[Mess hall]

NEELIX: Happy Kal Rekk, Mister Vulcan!
TUVOK: The holiday of Kal Rekk is not for two weeks.
NEELIX: But it's the Kal Rekk season.
TUVOK: There is no Kal Rekk season. Kal Rekk is a day of atonement, solitude and silence.
NEELIX: Atonement. Solitude. All your Vulcan holidays are the same. I've been doing some research, I know.
TUVOK: Why would you need to do research on Vulcan holidays?
NEELIX: It's part of my job as Morale officer.
TUVOK: Morale is irrelevant to a Vulcan.
NEELIX: Oh, please! There's no one on this ship requires my services more than you do. I will not rest until I see you smile.
TUVOK: Then you will not rest.
NEELIX: I don't suppose you've ever heard of the Vulcan Rumarie?
TUVOK: The Rumarie is an ancient pagan festival.
NEELIX: Full of barely clothed Vulcan men and women covered in slippery Rillan grease, chasing one another.
TUVOK: That has not been observed for a millennium.
NEELIX: Well, it's time to bring it back.
TORRES [OC]: Lieutenant Tuvok, report to Engineering immediately.
TUVOK: Acknowledged.
NEELIX: I've been thinking of a Rumarie theme for the mess hall next week. Lots of high fat, greasy foods, and if people want to take of their clothes and chase one another, well, it certainly wouldn't hurt morale around here.

[Engineering]

TUVOK: Is there a problem, Lieutenant?
(Torres indicates an open conduit. Inside are human remains.)

[Sickbay]

EMH: Ninety eight percent of his body suffered third degree plasma burns. If the circuit hadn't failed, he would have been vaporised.
TUVOK: It appeared that Mister Darwin entered the conduit to repair a faulty circuit when the accident occurred.
EMH: A perfectly good theory. Unfortunately it's wrong. This contusion is the result of a hard blow to the back of the skull.
TUVOK: Perhaps he fell and hit his head in the conduit.
EMH: The coup contra-coup pattern of breakage should tell us if the blow is the result of a moving head hitting a stationary object, or a moving object hitting a stationary head. In this case the pattern clearly indicates the latter. I'm sorry to report Crewman Darwin was murdered.

[Ready room]

TUVOK: At first glance there is no obvious motive. Crewman Darwin didn't have any known enemies on board.
JANEWAY: I've been looking over his Starfleet record. His training instructor recommended him as an Officers candidate. He turned it down to come with us. He has three sisters back home.
(Torres enters.)
TORRES: Sorry I'm late. These are the duty logs from last night. Lon Suder was the only one in Engineering when Frank Darwin came on duty.
JANEWAY: Something wrong?
CHAKOTAY: No, not really. I've just never really been comfortable with Suder, that's all. It's not like he ever did anything wrong, it's just
TORRES: As a Maquis, he did what he had to do a little too well.
JANEWAY: As in?
CHAKOTAY: As in killing Cardassians.
TUVOK: I don't recall observing anything unusual about Mister Suder's behaviour while I was on your ship.
CHAKOTAY: You weren't with him in battle. Around us he was the quietest, most unassuming guy you'll ever meet. Typical Betazoid, Kept to himself. I never knew much about him.
TORRES: In the Maquis, we didn't ask for resumes. We needed all the help we could get.
CHAKOTAY: A lot of us were doing what we were doing to protect our families, but Suder had his own reasons. I wish I could tell you what they were. In combat there was something in his eyes.
JANEWAY: Maybe he had something personal against Cardassians?
CHAKOTAY: Sometimes I had to pull him back, stop him from going too far. And once or twice when I did he looked at me with those cold eyes and I just knew he was this far away from killing me.
TUVOK: I find it curious that none of this was included in your initial crew evaluation, Commander.
CHAKOTAY: I don't put down hunches or bad feelings in my crew evaluations, Lieutenant. A Vulcan should appreciate that.
TUVOK: Considering the fact that your Maquis crew included malcontents, outlaws and mercenaries, I believe it would have been appropriate.
CHAKOTAY: I wasn't going to make it harder for any of them here. Suder did his job when he was serving with me and he's done his job since he's been on this ship.
JANEWAY: It seems clear where your investigation should begin, Lieutenant.

[Tuvok's office]

SUDER: You wished to see me, Mister Tuvok?
TUVOK: Sit down. You were alone in Engineering when Crewman Darwin reported for duty last night.
SUDER: Yes, sir.
TUVOK: Did you speak to him?
SUDER: No, we just sort of looked at each other and he did whatever he had to do and I did what I had to do.
TUVOK: And what was that?
SUDER: I was running a fuel consumption analysis for Lieutenant Torres. She can tell you. Are you accusing me of killing him?
TUVOK: I have accused no one at this time. Did you kill Crewman Darwin?
SUDER: No. No, I barely knew him. You know, just because I'm a Maquis doesn't make me a killer.
TUVOK: I will be speaking to everyone in Engineering, perhaps everyone on this ship, not just former members of the Maquis.
SUDER: We all know how you feel about the Maquis.
TUVOK: I assure you, I have no feelings about the Maquis.
SUDER: No, you just spied on us and were going to turn us all over to Starfleet.
TUVOK: As hard as it may be for you to understand, that did not require any feelings on my part. The Doctor places the time of death at twenty two fourteen. Do you remember what you were doing then?
SUDER: I was still running the fuel analysis. I worked on it until I went off duty.
TUVOK: Would you be surprised to know that your console was logged off at twenty two oh nine?
SUDER: That's not possible.
TUVOK: Do you have a criminal record, Mister Suder?
SUDER: Now that would be sort of difficult to check on, wouldn't it?
TUVOK: Why would you have any reason to lie?
SUDER: I don't.
TUVOK: Do you have a criminal record?
SUDER: No.
TUVOK: How would you describe your relationship with Crewman Darwin?
SUDER: I had no relationship.
TUVOK: No disagreements?
SUDER: No.
TUVOK: No fights?
SUDER: No.
TUVOK: No reason to kill him?
SUDER: No.
TUVOK: You are dismissed, Crewman. I may have more questions for you later.
(Suder leaves.)
EMH [OC]: Medlab to Lieutenant Tuvok.
TUVOK: Go ahead, Doctor.
EMH [OC]: I think I've found something that will help you.

[Sickbay]

EMH: Do you see the DNA strands on the lower border?
TUVOK: Yes. They were retrieved from inside the head wound by nanites that I designed to recognise unusual DNA patterns. This DNA was isolated because it didn't belong to the victim.
TUVOK: Have you matched it to a member of the crew?
(The EMH hands over a PADD.)
TUVOK: Are you certain?
EMH: DNA doesn't know how to lie, Lieutenant.

[Suder's quarters]

(Suder stares at the PADD.)
TUVOK: I must advise you that under Starfleet Directive one zero one you do not have to answer any questions.
SUDER: No. No, there's no point in denying it anymore. I used a two kilo coil spanner. He was sitting at the impulse system control panel. Didn't even look up when I moved in behind him and I swung the spanner as hard as I could.
TUVOK: Crewman, I suggest you speak to counsel.
SUDER: There was practically no blood. I was surprised at that. I figured that the EPS conduit was the easiest way to dispose of the body, but I must have damaged one of the circuits when I put him inside. Oh, I hid the spanner behind a comm. line access panel on deck seven.
TUVOK: Why did you kill him, Mister Suder?
SUDER: No reason.
TUVOK: That is not a satisfactory answer. You must have had some motive.
SUDER: I didn't like the way he looked at me.
(The Security guard takes Suder into custody.)

[Sickbay]

(The blood on the coil spanner has been analysed.)
EMH: No doubt about it, this is the murder weapon. Mister Suder is apparently telling the truth. You don't seem satisfied, Lieutenant.
TUVOK: No.
EMH: You have a confession and the murder weapon.
TUVOK: And no established motive.
EMH: Does it matter?
TUVOK: Crime must have a logical purpose.
EMH: Ah yes, I see. How to close the case without understanding the logic of the crime. For a Vulcan, that would be a dilemma, wouldn't it.
TUVOK: Doctor, is it possible that Mister Suder is psychotic?
EMH: I doubt it. Kes, call up his genetic profile.
KES: The neurogenetic markers are normal. There's no tendency towards bipolar disorder.
EMH: So he's not insane, per se. What do the elevated norepinephrine levels suggest?
KES: Aggressive, even violent tendencies.
TUVOK: Why didn't you report this immediately after your examination, Doctor?
EMH: These readings are not significantly different from those of the other Maquis crewmen. Obviously it takes a certain personality type to be attracted to the life of an outlaw.
KES: Don't you believe his confession, Tuvok?
TUVOK: In fact I do. Nevertheless, my job is not finished until I determine a motive.
EMH: And what if there was no motive?
TUVOK: One may not recognise the motivation, but there is always motivation.
EMH: I think you are trapped in your own Vulcan logic, Lieutenant. All of us have violent instincts. We have evolved from predators. Well, not me, of course, I've just been programmed by you predators. The question is, in a civilised world, can we suppress those instincts? Most of the time we can. Vulcans certainly can. You've got your violent feelings buried underneath centuries of control. But the rest of the humanoid races aren't always so skilled at self-discipline. Crewman Suder may have violent impulses that he just can't control.
TUVOK: Do you believe that a look by Mister Darwin could provoke such a violent reaction?
EMH: It has been known to happen.
TUVOK: I do not accept that explanation.

[Brig]

SUDER: I already told you why I killed him, Lieutenant.
TUVOK: You didn't like the way he looked at you.
SUDER: Right.
TUVOK: Just how did he look at you?
SUDER: Like a lot of people in Starfleet do.
TUVOK: So this murder could in fact be explained as an outburst of rage against Starfleet.
SUDER: Look, if that's how you want to look at this.
TUVOK: I want the truth.
SUDER: I don't like Starfleet, I won't deny that, but
TUVOK: Yes?
SUDER: I have killed people who weren't in Starfleet for the same reason. I did not like the way they looked at me. I've thought about killing you, Lieutenant.
TUVOK: In my case, you have a motive. My previous mission as a spy, my role as your accuser. But to my knowledge, Crewman Darwin had done nothing to you.
SUDER: That's true.
TUVOK: Then why chose him as a victim?
SUDER: I don't know.
TUVOK: Do you feel remorse?
SUDER: I don't seem to feel anything at all. Most Betazoids can sense other people's emotions. I can't even sense my own. So what's going to happen to me now?
TUVOK: I'll have to discuss that with the Captain.
SUDER: I know what I'd do if I were her. Guess I'm lucky. The Federation doesn't execute people.
(Tuvok leaves, and almost gets to the turbolift before he turns and goes back again.)
TUVOK: It is important that I understand why you killed Mister Darwin.
SUDER: I wish I could help you, Lieutenant.
TUVOK: You can. And indirectly I may be able to help you as well. Do you know what a mind meld is?
SUDER: It's that Vulcan thing where you grab someone's head.
TUVOK: We would be telepathically linked, exchanging our thoughts. In essence, becoming one mind.
SUDER: One mind? You and me? I wouldn't recommend that, Lieutenant.
TUVOK: It is not without risk, but as a Vulcan I have internal processes that allow me to control violent instincts. I believe I will be able to suppress whatever feelings I draw from you.
SUDER: And how will I be helped by all this?
TUVOK: It is likely that you will gain, at least for a time, some of my self discipline to better control your violent nature.
SUDER: What do I have to do?
TUVOK: Release the forcefield.
(Ayala draws his phaser then releases the cell forcefield. Tuvok enters.)
TUVOK: My mind to your mind. Your thoughts to my thoughts.

[Holodeck - Sandrine's]

COMPUTER: Radiogenic particle density at the measured co-ordinates was one eight seven three per cubic metre.
PARIS: And the winner of sixteen replicator rations in the Paris radiogenic sweepstakes is? Computer?
COMPUTER: There is no winner today.
PARIS: What? No winner? Computer, are you positive?
COMPUTER: Try your luck again. Tomorrow you could be a winner.
KIM: Very funny.
PARIS: You heard the little lady. Try your luck again, folks. The pot grows daily until we have a winner. Enter your name on the PADD and pick a number. Can I buy you lunch, Mister Kim? I have an extra ration today.
KIM: Two, by my count. Ten percent of the day's action. The only one who wins every day is you.
PARIS: I think I'll have some prime rib, medium rare, mashed potatoes, creamed spinach, and maybe some Yorkshire pudding. And a Raktajino with whipped cream on it.

[Ready room]

TUVOK: So it ultimately turned out to be a worthwhile and enlightening experience.
JANEWAY: Did you get any of the answers you were after?
TUVOK: It is difficult for me to accept, Captain, but Mister Suder was telling the truth as he knew it. He is a man with an incredibly violent nature living in an environment without any outlet to express it. I am surprised he was able to maintain his self control for as long as he did.
JANEWAY: I guess in his earlier life he always found ways to release those impulses, like volunteering for the Maquis. What do we do with him?
TUVOK: If we were home, he'd be sent to prison.
JANEWAY: The brig is the closest thing we have. But I don't think we can just leave him down in our dungeon for the rest of the trip.
TUVOK: Nor would it be appropriate to leave him in the custody of someone in this quadrant.
JANEWAY: I agree.
TUVOK: Captain, he is prepared to die for his crime.
JANEWAY: An execution? You're not seriously suggesting that we
TUVOK: I only mention it because of the extenuating circumstances, and because he feels it would be an appropriate punishment.
JANEWAY: I don't. I prefer to rehabilitate him, not to end his life. We'll confine him to quarters. Work with Kim to install maximum security containment.
TUVOK: Pardon me, Captain, but allowing him the comfort of his own quarters doesn't seem an appropriate punishment for murder.
JANEWAY: If we don't get home soon, he'll be in that room a long time, Mister Tuvok. I think this is the best we can do under these circumstances.
TUVOK: Crewman Darwin's three sisters might not agree.
JANEWAY: How is Suder since the mind meld?
TUVOK: Quite calm and controlled. Clearly the meld initiated some high cortical activity in his brain.
JANEWAY: And you, Tuvok? Any adverse effects?
TUVOK: I will admit that I am more disconcerted than I anticipated.
JANEWAY: Why don't you take a day or two off for meditation.
TUVOK: Thank you, but I am already taking steps to purge these residual feelings. I don't believe time off will be necessary. I will of course advise you of any further complications.
JANEWAY: Tuvok. Take care of yourself.

[Mess hall]

TUVOK: I would prefer to be alone.
NEELIX: Okay, all right. Far be it from me to bother anyone. If you really want me to leave, I'll leave.
TUVOK: I really want you to leave.
NEELIX: I don't believe you. Your voice says go away, but your heart want me to make you smile.
TUVOK: Please, go away.
NEELIX: Come on. A little smile. How is it going to hurt? I won't tell anyone.
TUVOK: What must I do to convince you to stop.
NEELIX: Come on, just a little itty bitty smile. Just let the mouth curl a little then. There's an old Talaxian song my mother used to sing me as a child. I'm going to sing it to you every day from now on. It goes
(Tuvok grabs Neelix by the throat and pushes him up against the wall.)
NEELIX: Mister Vulcan, I can't breathe, I can't breathe, I'm sorry, I, I
(Tuvok releases Neelix's body.)
TUVOK: Computer, end holodeck programme.

[Holodeck - Sandrine's]

COMPUTER: Particle density at the measured co-ordinates was one four one five per cubic metre.
PARIS: And the winner is? Computer? Computer?
CHAKOTAY: There won't be any more winners.
PARIS: Oh come on, Chakotay. We're just having a little fun. The recreational facilities of the Delta Quadrant being what they are.
CHAKOTAY: I've heard you're responsible for this, Lieutenant.
PARIS: I didn't think Starfleet would have a problem with it.
CHAKOTAY: With a senior officer running a gambling operation and skimming profits from each days proceeds? Now why would Starfleet have a problem with that? Since you all seem to have extra replicator rations you won't be needing these. Today's pot is hereby confiscated. The Captain's put a lot of faith in you, Mister Paris. She'll be disappointed. You're on report.
(Chakotay is halfway out the door.)
PARIS: Now there's a tough job, filling out reports. But somebody's got to do it.
(Chakotay leaves.)
KIM: Thanks a lot.

[Brig]

SUDER: I did not hear you come in, Lieutenant.
TUVOK: How are you feeling?
SUDER: Centred.
TUVOK: Don't be misled. Your violent instincts still exist. You are simply suppressing them as Vulcans do.
SUDER: I can feel the difference. It is almost as if I can observe the violence inside me without letting it get too close. It is quite remarkable what you Vulcans have learnt to do.
TUVOK: Understand that this will not be a permanent change unless you commit to a strict daily regime of meditation and mental exercise. I also believe that a series of holodeck programmes designed to allow your violent tendencies to be released in a safe environment may help to purge your aggressive impulses.
SUDER: Holographic violence does not give the same sensation as the real thing. I've tried it.
TUVOK: Has anyone ever suggested targeted neurosynaptic therapy?
SUDER: That didn't work either.
TUVOK: Our Doctor is programmed with the medical knowledge of every Federation world. Perhaps he'll know of some treatment you haven't tried.
SUDER: Since the meld, I feel capable of controlling myself. Perhaps with your help I can learn to stay this way. It must be difficult for you.
TUVOK: Difficult?
SUDER: Knowing violence as I've known it.
TUVOK: I have studied violence for over a hundred years.
SUDER: Studying it and knowing it are two different things, aren't they. It's attractive, isn't it.
TUVOK: Attractive?
SUDER: Violence.
TUVOK: On the contrary. I find it disturbing.
SUDER: You're right, it is disturbing, never knowing when that impulse may come or whether or not you can control it when it does. You live on the edge of every moment, and yet, in it's own way, violence is attractive, too. Maybe because it doesn't require logic. Perhaps that's why it's so liberating. Ironic, isn't it, that I can share with you of all people what I have hidden from everyone all my life. Can we do it again, Tuvok?
TUVOK: Again?
SUDER: Meld.
TUVOK: That would not be advisable.
SUDER: I understand. Really, I do. I've thought about it a lot. In a way, a mind meld is almost an act of violence, isn't it.
TUVOK: I don't understand why you
SUDER: Penetration. Your will dissolving mine. The joining. It seems to me that a mind meld might be fatal if you lost control.

[Tuvok's quarters]

TUVOK: Computer, place level one security seals on this room.
COMPUTER: Acknowledged. Security seals in place.
TUVOK: Delete security clearance Tuvok one four nine four lambda.
COMPUTER: Specified security clearance deleted.
TUVOK: Please inform the Captain that I am no longer fit for duty.
COMPUTER: Acknowledged.

[Outside Tuvok's quarters]

JANEWAY: Computer, lift the security seal from Lieutenant Tuvok's quarters. (to guard) Wait here.

[Tuvok's quarters]

(The place has been smashed up. Tuvok is sitting in a corner in the dark.)
TUVOK: I would advise you not to enter, Captain.
JANEWAY: Tuvok.
TUVOK: Please, do not come any closer.
JANEWAY: Talk to me.
TUVOK: I said, don't come any closer.
JANEWAY: We need to get you to Sickbay.
TUVOK: It would be safer for the crew if I were to remain in these quarters. I remind you, I am trained in the martial arts of many Alpha quadrant cultures. Sitting here, attempting to meditate, I have counted the number of ways I know of killing someone using just a finger, a hand, a foot. I had reached ninety four when you entered.
JANEWAY: The Doctor is fully versed in Vulcan medicine.
TUVOK: Again, for safety reasons, I recommend you sedate me before you initiate transport.

[Sickbay]

(Tuvok is lying on the biobed in the surgical bay, sedated and with cortical blinkies on his temples.)
KES: Levels of neuropeptides in the limbic systems are down fifteen percent.
EMH: There's a definite neurochemical imbalance in the mesiofrontal cortex.
JANEWAY: Which means what?
EMH: That's where the Vulcan psycho-suppression systems are located. This may be the result of an incompatibility with the Betazoid telepathic neural centre, I'm not sure.
(The EMH walks through the surgical bay forcefield.)
EMH: Vulcan mind melds. Utter foolishness. Anybody with an ounce of sense wouldn't share his brain with someone else. Would you? I certainly wouldn't. And of course, when something goes wrong, and believe me it does more often than they'd like to admit, the first thing they call out is Doctor.
JANEWAY: Can you help him?
EMH: I wish I could tell you. There's a recommended course of treatments that should begin immediately.
JANEWAY: What does it involve?
EMH: First we have to take away his ability to control his violence. We do this in short bursts over a period of time and hope it provides a shock to his system. If it works, his own neural controls will take over again. I believe we're about ready. Revive him.
TUVOK: Something has changed.
EMH: We've temporarily removed all of your emotional suppression abilities, Lieutenant. How do you feel?
TUVOK: I feel.
JANEWAY: Tuvok, do you know where you are?
TUVOK: (laughs) Of course I know where I am, Captain. I'm just not sure I know who I am.
EMH: Try to relax. The treatment still has about three minutes to go.
TUVOK: Oh, it must be working, because I feel very strong. Very powerful. Quite euphoric. This must be how my ancestors felt. Doctor, would you consider allowing me to remain this way for a while? It would be a valuable opportunity for me to study primal Vulcan behaviour.
EMH: Sorry, I'm not prepared to do that. The course of treatment is very specific.
TUVOK: You are not invulnerable, hologram. A few well chosen commands to the computer and you will cease to exist.
(Tuvok throws a wheelchair at the forcefield.)
KES: Two minutes, thirty seconds left.
TUVOK: You look shocked, Captain. You must be asking yourself, what if this doesn't work? What do we do then? I have an idea. I'll just stay in my quarters for the rest of the trip. I'll just relax and read, eat the ship's food, use the ship's energy, all in the comforts of my own room. Why, even Mister Suder and I could get together for a few hands of Cardassian pinochle once or twice a week. That is how we treat violent offenders on this ship, isn't it?
JANEWAY: You are not a violent offender, Tuvok.
TUVOK: I could be. Just like Suder. You know, Captain, I don't mind telling you something the other Tuvok never would. You are wrong. Sparing Suder's life is a sign of weakness. You disgust me. All you humans do. Admit it! Part of you feels as I do. Part of you wants him to die for what he did.
JANEWAY: No part of me feels that way.
TUVOK: Liar! He has killed and you know he deserves to die! On behalf of the victim's family, Captain, I beg you to reconsider. Give them the satisfaction of his execution. I have a radical suggestion, Captain. Release the forcefield and I'll kill him for you. Release the forcefield. (to Kes) My student, my protégée. there is so much for each of us to learn today, isn't there.
KES: You'll be all right, Tuvok. This'll be over in thirty seconds.
TUVOK: Listen to what I tell you. Release the forcefield.
KES: I'm sorry. I had them disable your telepathic abilities too. You can't reach me, Tuvok.
TUVOK: Release the forcefield!
(Tuvok tries to push his hand through the forcefield.)
EMH: Ten seconds. Five seconds.
(Tuvok collapses.)
EMH: It's over.
KES: He's lost consciousness.
EMH: He might be able to fool the sensors. Sedate him again. Computer, remove the forcefield.
JANEWAY: Help me get him back on the bed. How many treatments do you think will be necessary?
EMH: I wish I knew, Captain. In a sense, Mister Tuvok's mind is fighting a classic battle between good and evil. The battle may be won in a day, a year, or it may never be won.

[Brig]

(Tuvok wakes up in Sickbay, alone and bathed in sweat. The forcefield is still there. He pulls off the blinkies then dismantles one to help him pull an EPS cable from the wall. He uses it to short out the forcefield. Ayala is dealt with quickly in the Brig.)
SUDER: Tuvok? I wondered what happened to you. They wouldn't tell me anything.
TUVOK: There were some complications from the meld.
SUDER: I wondered about that.
TUVOK: I've been undergoing neurosynaptic therapy in Sickbay.
SUDER: It didn't work.
TUVOK: No.
SUDER: Have you come to kill me?
TUVOK: To execute you for your crime.
SUDER: To execute me. I see. And calling it that makes it more comfortable for you.
TUVOK: I will take no comfort in this.
SUDER: A most logical use of violence, to punish the violent.
(Tuvok lowers the cell forcefield.)
SUDER: We both know that I am prepared to die, but are you prepared to kill?
TUVOK: It needs to be done.
SUDER: To release your violent impulses?
TUVOK: To serve justice.
SUDER: Justice or vengeance? Understand one thing, Tuvok. I can promise you this will not silent your demons. If you can't control the violence, the violence controls you. Be prepared to yield your entire being to it, to sacrifice your place in civilised life for you will no longer be a part of it, and there's no return.
(Tuvok grabs Suder's head.)
TUVOK: I seek no return!
SUDER: Of course, you would not be able to live with yourself. Then we are both to die, and that will end the torment.
TUVOK: My mind to your mind. My thoughts to your thoughts. My mind to your mind, my thoughts to your thoughts.
(They sink to their knees, and finally Tuvok releases him before collapsing. Suder rolls him over and uses his comm. badge.)
SUDER: Crewman Suder to the Bridge.
CHAKOTAY [OC]: Suder, what are you doing with a comm. badge?
SUDER: You'd better get down here, Chakotay. Lieutenant Tuvok needs help.

Captain's log, supplemental. Ensign Suder has been incarcerated in secured quarters where he will likely spend the rest of our journey home. Lieutenant Tuvok remains under observation in Sickbay.

[Sickbay]

EMH: It may be hard for you to believe, Lieutenant, but what happened is encouraging. Your inability to complete the act of murder shows your suppression system in starting to function again. You're on your way back to being normal, although I'm not sure how the word normal applies to a species that suppresses all their emotions.
TUVOK: Captain, I must apologise for my inappropriate behaviour.
JANEWAY: I'm just glad we have you back, Mister Tuvok.
TUVOK: I was most insulting to you.
JANEWAY: Don't worry about it. I've been insulted before.
TUVOK: I hope you understand that I have always had the greatest respect for you as a Captain, and consider you a friend.
JANEWAY: That means a great deal to me. Enough said. Get some rest. Tuvok. No more mind melds without my permission. Understood?

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