The Time Monster

Original Airdate: May 20, 1972

Episode One

[Nightmare]

(The volcanic eruption from Inferno jolts the Doctor upright from his chaise longue on a mosaic floor. Either side of an altar stand a pair of large Minoan quadruple-headed axes, and behind them a giant complex crystal pulses.)
MASTER: Welcome! Welcome to your new Master!
(The Master breaks into maniacal laughter, a lightning bolt comes down and he vanishes. Volcanic smoke fills the room, there are images of ceremonial masks and Minoan gods and goddesses.)
DOCTOR: Jo! Jo! Jo!

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: Jo.
JO: Doctor. Doctor. Are you all right?
DOCTOR: Oh. Oh, I must have been dreaming.
JO: I'll say you were. A real pippin of a dream. I've brought you a cup of tea. Do you want it?
DOCTOR: Yes. Volcanoes and earthquakes.
(The Doctor gets up, walks a few steps and hands the cup of tea back to Jo.)
DOCTOR: Thank you. I enjoyed that.
JO: Doctor, have you been working all night again? On that? I don't know. What is anyway, a super dematerialisation circuit?
DOCTOR: Oh, no. No, that'll have to wait. No, this is far more important. It might make all the difference the next time he turns up.
JO: The next time who turns up?
DOCTOR: The Master, of course. Jo, now listen to me. I want you to find out as quickly as possible if there have been any volcanic eruptions or severe earthquakes recently. It doesn't matter where. Anywhere in the world.
JO: You're joking, of course.
DOCTOR: Believe me, this is no matter for jokes.
JO: But I read it all out to last night, I. Don't go away.
(Jo fetches a newspaper from a table by the chaise longue.)
JO: It just shows you don't listen to a word I say, doesn't it. Now, yes, here we are. New eruptions in the Thera group of islands. Somewhere off Greece.
DOCTOR: Does it say anything about a crystal?
JO: Crystal?
DOCTOR: Mmm.
JO: No, what crystal? Look, I know I'm exceedingly dim, but would you mind explaining? 
DOCTOR: It was in my dream, Jo. There was a large crystal, shaped like a trident.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(That would be a large version of the one being held up by a man in a white coat and shown to his blonde lady assistant.)
MASTER: (with a very slight Greek accent) A simple piece of quartz, nothing more.
RUTH: But Professor Thascales, that is ridiculous.
MASTER: Of course it is, Doctor Ingram. Of course it is.
(The Master puts the crystal into a box-like device.)
MASTER: You know, there is no means whereby I could prove to you that that crystal is any different from any other piece of quartz, and yet it is unique. As you say, ridiculous!

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Master takes off his lab coat as they go into the main area of the lab.)
RUTH: So, this is the missing piece of equipment we've been waiting for?
MASTER: Exactly.
(A young man with long hair and moustache enters.)
HYDE: I'll swear I switched that alarm off in my sleep. Oh, sorry, Prof.
RUTH: Simmer down, Stu, for Pete's sake.
MASTER: Please do not call me Prof.
HYDE: In the doghouse again.
MASTER: Now quiet, both of you. Now listen. I have a meeting with the new director in two and a half minutes, so I'm afraid I shall have to leave the final tests for the demonstration to the two of you.
RUTH: But aren't we going to have a trial run, Professor?
MASTER: No, it's not necessary.
HYDE: Well, that's marvellous. We're going to look a right bunch of Charlies if this fellow from the Grants Committee turns up and we're left with egg on our faces.
RUTH: Yes, surely, Professor, it would be very unwise
MASTER: Now look, my dear, there is no need for you to worry your pretty little head.
RUTH: And there's no need for you to be so patronising, Professor. Look, just because I'm a woman, there's no need to treat me like
HYDE: Here we go.
MASTER: No, no, no, I'm sorry, you're quite right, Doctor. Please forgive me. And now, er, would you please run those tests?
(The Master leaves.)
RUTH: That man. You know, I don't what infuriates me more. His dictatorial manner or that infernal courtesy of his. It's all the same, really. A bland assumption of male superiority.
HYDE: May God bless the good ship women's lib and all who sail in her.

[UNIT Laboratory]

(Yates unrolls a map and points to an island labelled Niohpa.)
YATES: There you are, Jo, the Thera group. Those little islands there.
JO: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Mmm?
JO: Come and take a look.
DOCTOR: No, not now, Jo. I'm busy.
JO: But it's the map you asked for.
DOCTOR: Oh?
YATES: There, you see?
DOCTOR: Thera. It doesn't mean a thing to me.
JO: Well, it says Santorini in brackets. Well, that must be another name for it. How about that?
DOCTOR: Oh, let's forget all about it, Jo, shall we? I just had a nightmare, that's all.
JO: Sorry, Mike.
YATES: Better than hanging round the duty room. If nothing turns up soon, I'll go round the twist.
JO: That makes two of us. Here was I, all ready for a nice little trip to Atlantis.
DOCTOR: What?
JO: Well, nothing. I was just saying to Mike
DOCTOR: Yes, I heard what you said, but you said Atlantis. Why Atlantis?
JO: Well, that's what it says in the paper.
DOCTOR: Give me that map, Captain Yates.
JO: Yes, here we are. Believed by many modern historians to be all that remains of Plato's metropolis of Atlantis.
DOCTOR: Of course. Of course.
YATES: Atlantis? I thought that was supposed to be in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean?
JO: You're a bit out of date. Apparently it was part of the Minoan civilisation. Oh, you know, the Minotaur and all the Cretan jazz.
YATES: It's only a legend though, isn't it?
DOCTOR: Jo, get me the Brigadier, will you?
JO: What, now?
DOCTOR: Yes, now.
JO: Oh, all right.
YATES: The Brig? Why the Brig, for heaven's sake?
JO: Search me.
(Jo picks up the telephone.)
JO: Doctor? It's the Brigadier.
DOCTOR: Hello, Brigadier? It's the Doctor here. Now listen to me. I want you to put out a world wide warning. Alert all your precious UNIT HQ's, not that it'll do any good.

[Brigadier's office]

BRIGADIER: Thank you very much. And against what precisely am I supposed to be warning the world?
DOCTOR [OC]: The Master. I've just seen him.
BRIGADIER: (Into phone.) Seen him? Where? When?

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: In a dream. Not half an hour ago.
(The Brigadier has come to the lab as the Master has left the Newton Institute - actually Swallowfield Park, Berkshire.)
BRIGADIER: In any case, Doctor, every section of UNIT now has the search for the Master written into standing orders.
DOCTOR: Priority Z one hundred and forty four, I suppose?
BRIGADIER: Priority A one, actually.
DOCTOR: Look, I tell you, Brigadier, there is grave danger.
BRIGADIER: Danger of what, for heavens sake?
DOCTOR: Well, I'm not sure, but in my dream I quite clearly saw
BRIGADIER: You know, if this got out, you'd be the laughing stock of UNIT. A dream. Really, Doctor, you'll be consulting the entrails of a sheep next.
(Jo laughs.)
BRIGADIER: Right, we'd better be on our way to the Newton Institute. Ready, Doctor?
DOCTOR: No, I can't go anywhere at the moment. I'm far too busy.
BRIGADIER: But I told them you'd be coming. Two observers from UNIT, they said.
JO: Oh, shall I go?
DOCTOR: No, certainly not, Jo. I shall need you here with me.
JO: Well, what's it all about anyway?
BRIGADIER: TOM-TIT, that's what it's all about. A demonstration of TOM-TIT.
YATES: TOM-TIT? What on earth does that stand for?
BRIGADIER: Well, it's the, er, the trans
DOCTOR: Transmission Of Matter Through Interstitial Time.
BRIGADIER: Yes, exactly what I was going to say. TOM-TIT.
JO: Well, what does it do?
BRIGADIER: Oh, it's a brilliant idea. Apparently it can break down solid objects into light-waves or whatever, and transmit them from one place to another.
YATES: And it works?
BRIGADIER: Apparently. Well, Yates, I suppose you'd better come with me.
YATES: Sorry, sir. I'm Duty Officer.
BRIGADIER: Well, someone's got to come.
(Benton enters, in ordinary clothes and carrying a bag.)
BENTON: I'm just leaving, sir.
BRIGADIER: Ah, Sergeant Benton. The very man.
BENTON: But I'm just off on a forty eight hour pass, sir.
BRIGADIER: Oh no, you're not, Sergeant. You're coming for a little trip to the Newton Institute.
BENTON: Yes, sir. The where, sir? The Newton Institute?
BRIGADIER: That's right. It's a research establishment at Wootton, just outside Cambridge.

[Director's office]

(At the Institute.)
MASTER: A charlatan? How dare you.
PERCIVAL: Doctor Cook is not only chairman of the Grants Committee, but a colleague and a personal friend. Am I to tell him this afternoon that I am as gullible as that drunkard I have replaced? How is it that I can find no trace of your academic career before you visited Athens University, Professor? How is it that you publish nothing? That you refuse to reveal the hypothesis behind your so-called experiment? That the very name of your project is arrogant nonsense! TOM-TIT! What, pray, is interstitial time?
MASTER: You're a very clever man, Director. I can see that I shall have to tell you everything. Oh, yes, you're perfectly right. I am no professor.
PERCIVAL: Ah, say no more.
MASTER: But do please hear me out. I can see that you're very upset.
PERCIVAL: Upset.
MASTER: But there is nothing to worry about. You must believe me. You must believe me. You must believe me.
(Percival looks the Master in the eye, and gets the Look in return.)
PERCIVAL: Must believe you.
MASTER: I am the Master. You will listen to me, and you will obey me. You will obey me!
PERCIVAL: Obey. Obey. I will obey.
MASTER: That's better. Now you just sit there quietly and await the arrival of this wretched man from London. And remember you are perfectly satisfied as to the authenticity of my credentials, and the integrity of my work here. You understand?
PERCIVAL: Yes I understand.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(Ruth is at the control desk in the main lab while Stuart Hyde is in the radiation lab next door.)
RUTH: One point three five nine.
HYDE [OC]: One point three five nine, check.
RUTH: Two point oh four five.
HYDE [OC]: Two point oh four five, check.
RUTH: Three point oh six two.
HYDE [OC]: Three point oh six two, check.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

RUTH [OC]: Five nine and steady.
HYDE: Five nine and steady. 
RUTH [OC]: And that's the lot.
HYDE: And that's the lot. Check, check, check.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

RUTH: Now we just stand around and wait.
(Hyde enters.)
RUTH: You know, I still think it's just plain stupid not to do a trial run. It's ludicrous.
HYDE: Ludicrous, check.
RUTH: Oh, grow up, Stu.
HYDE: No, but I mean it, love. It is ludicrous. I mean, just suppose this thing won't wag its tail when we tell it to?
RUTH: Well, they withdraw the grant.
HYDE: As sure as God made little green apples, and bang goes my fellowship.
RUTH: Bang goes my job. And my reputation, too, for that matter. Men. It's their conceit that bugs me.
HYDE: Hey, hey, I'm on your side, remember?
RUTH: Oh, you don't count.
HYDE: Oh, don't I? And why not, may I ask?
RUTH: Look, don't bully me, Stu, or I think I'll burst into tears.
HYDE: Let's do it!
RUTH: What?
HYDE: Have a run through.
RUTH: Without him?
HYDE: Well, why not?
RUTH: Well, it is his project. I mean, he's the boss.
HYDE: Nominally. But you think how much you've put into it. It's a joint affair. I reckon you've as much right to take a decision as he has.
RUTH: Well.
HYDE: Course, if you need a man in charge.
RUTH: That does it. We go ahead.
HYDE: That's my girl.

[UNIT HQ laboratory]

(The Doctor is finishing his latest device, hand sized with two dials on the face.)
JO: You know, Doctor, you're quite the most infuriating man I've ever met. I've asked you at least a million times, what is it?
DOCTOR: Extraordinary. I could have sworn I'd told you. It's a time sensor.
JO: Oh, I see.
DOCTOR: Do you? Well, what's it do then? 
JO: Well, it, er.
DOCTOR: Mmm hmm?
JO: It, er, detects disturbances in a time field.
DOCTOR: Well done, Jo. You're learning. Exactly what you need if you happen to be looking for a Tardis.
JO: It's a Tardis sniffer-outer.
DOCTOR: Or any other time machine, for that matter. So, if the Master turns up again
JO: Bingo.
DOCTOR: As you so rightly say, Bingo.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(Hyde is putting on a radiation suit.)
HYDE: I feel like the back end of a pantomime horse.
RUTH: Very suitable for a keen young man like you.
HYDE: Eh, come again?
RUTH: Starting at the bottom.
HYDE: Oh! Anyway, it's just a waste of time. Why should there be any radiation in the receiver room? We're only going to use about ten degrees.
RUTH: Are you willing to take the risk?
HYDE: No.
RUTH: Well, stop beefing then and get on with it.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(The window cleaner leans his ladder against the building and climbs up to do the first floor, and looks straight into the radiation lab.)
HYDE: Interstitial activity. nil.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(A white lidded jar is on the send platform.)
RUTH: Molecular structure stable. Increasing power. Two oh, two five, three oh.

[UNIT HQ laboratory]

(The Doctor has gone inside the Tardis.)
JO: I say, Doctor, you're not going to disappear to Venus or anywhere like that, are you?
DOCTOR [OC]: No, no. You just keep your eye on those dials.
(A little round aerial on the time detector starts spinning.)
JO: It's working!
DOCTOR [OC]: Well of course it's working. Now make a note of the readings, will you?
JO: All right.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

RUTH: Three five, four oh, four five.
HYDE: Check, check, check!

[UNIT Laboratory]

(The time detector stops spinning and flashing. The Doctor comes out of the Tardis.)
JO: Well done.
DOCTOR: Thank you.
JO: It's a bit out on distance though. It says the Tardis is only a foot away.
DOCTOR: Oh, that's Venusian feet.
JO: Oh, they're larger than ours.
DOCTOR: Oh yeah, much larger. Always tripping over themselves, the Venusians. Good, that's good.
(The time detector springs into life.)
JO: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Mmm?
JO: I think you must have left something on in the Tardis.
DOCTOR: I certainly didn't. why?
JO: Well, it's started again.
DOCTOR: That's impossible unless
JO: Unless what?
DOCTOR: Another Tardis!

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

RUTH [OC]: Isolate matrix scanner.
HYDE: Check.
RUTH [OC]: Five oh, five five, six oh.
(The outline of the jar flickers on the receiving plate.)
HYDE: It's going to work!
RUTH [OC]: Pipe down and concentrate. Stand by. Initiating transfer now.
HYDE: Ten, nine, eight

[Director's office]

(The Master has taken over the office and is working at the desk. Outside the clock over the old stable block starts to chime eleven, but the chimes become longer and longer.)
MASTER: Why, the fools!

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The jar is glowing.)
HYDE [OC]: Four, three, two, one! (Ruth pushes a lever over to full and the jar disappears.)

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(And appears. The window cleaner's jaw hits the ground.)
HYDE: Okay, Ruth, switch off. We've done it!
RUTH [OC]: Stuart, come here!
HYDE: Eh?
RUTH [OC]: Come here, Stuart!

[Newton Institute laboratory]

RUTH: It's a positive feedback. She's overloading! Look, you'll have to bring the surge down as I reduce the power or she'll blow.
HYDE: Right!
(Next door, the window cleaner watches the crystal in the device glow, then he falls backwards off his ladder, slowly. The Master comes out of the admin block and sees the ladder up against the wall.)
HYDE: We've done it! We've done it! We've done it! We've done it! We've done it! We've done it! We've done it! We've done it! We've done it!
(The Master stands in the doorway.)

[UNIT HQ laboratory]

(The Doctor is looking at a map of England.)
DOCTOR: Now, I put it somewhere in that sector there. Anything between fifty and a hundred miles from here.
JO: Well, that's not much to go on.
DOCTOR: No, not unless he switches his Tardis on again.
JO: Well, you never know, he might.
DOCTOR: If we were a bit nearer and in Bessie.
JO: Right. Let's go. You take the map.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

MASTER: You are a fool, Doctor Ingram.
RUTH: You have no right to call me a fool
MASTER: Be silent! You may have caused irreparable damage.
RUTH: Look, I was in full control the whole time.
MASTER: That is irrelevant. Mister Hyde, why did you permit this stupidity?
HYDE: Here, hang about, mate. I'm not my sister's keeper. She's the boss. Anyway, I suggested it.
MASTER: Yes, I might have guessed it. You're behaving like a an irresponsible schoolboy. You'll pay for this.
RUTH: The decision, professor, was entirely mine.
MASTER: Ah, I see. Therefore
RUTH: I take I take full responsibility for testing the apparatus, and I'm prepared to justify my actions at the highest level. Perhaps we'd better go and see the Director right away and sort this out.
MASTER: No, no, no, no, no, no. I'm sorry, Doctor. Please excuse me. That won't be necessary. We need take this matter no further.
RUTH: Well, that's all very well, Professor, but after what you
MASTER: Please, Doctor, accept my apologies.
RUTH: Oh well, perhaps it was a bit unethical of me not to have told you.
HYDE: Oh, come off it, Ruth. He's only climbing down because he doesn't want us to walk out. He needs us for the demo.
MASTER: How very clever of you, Mister Hyde. Of course I need you. Both of you.
HYDE: After all, Prof, we couldn't risk a foul-up this afternoon when the
MASTER: Now say no more. The whole matter is closed.
RUTH: Well, not quite, professor. You see, it wasn't exactly plain sailing. We had some sort of a positive feedback. An overload.
MASTER: But, but that is impossible.
RUTH: See for yourself.
(Ruth tears off the computer printout for the Master.)
RUTH: See?
MASTER: I see. Yes. Of course, how foolish of me.
HYDE: Hey, Ruth, Professor, come here.
RUTH: What is it, Stu?
HYDE: The crystal. It's still glowing.
MASTER: Well, of course it is!
RUTH: Well, you know what caused the overload then?
MASTER: Yes. Don't you see? You were drawing power from somewhere outside of time itself. Now, what we have to do is to build a time vector filter into the transmitter here. Look, let me show you. something like this.
(The Master sketches a diagram on the back of the printout.)
MASTER: It's a paracybernetic control circuit, in fact.
RUTH: Yes, but won't that take some time to set up? The demonstration's at two.
MASTER: Yes, I'm afraid it will take some time, and I'm afraid I will have to leave it to you, because I am expected to eat a pretentious meal and exchange pleasantries with our distinguished guests.
HYDE: That's all right, Prof. You go and enjoy your nosh. Leave it to the toiling masses.
MASTER: Mister Hyde, I have every faith in you. And in you, Doctor. There.
HYDE: Hey, you'd better get your skates on. The VIP's are arriving. Escorted by a UNIT jeep, no less.
MASTER: What?
(The Master and Hyde look out of the window as the car and Land Rover draw up near the fallen window cleaner and the Brigadier gets out.)
MASTER: What are they doing here?
HYDE: Military observers. Happens all the time. They're the only ones with enough money for our sort of nonsense.
MASTER: I see. Doctor Ingram, I've changed my mind. I will set up this filter myself.
RUTH: Well, I'm perfectly capable of constructing a simple circuit, Professor.
MASTER: I am sure that you are equally capable of devouring a tough pheasant on my behalf.
RUTH: Well, why can't you go and devour it?
MASTER: Look, Doctor, please. I am lifelong pacifist. Now the association of the military with killing, with violence. Please bear with me.
RUTH: Very well. I'll get them to send some sandwiches across to you.
HYDE: Good thinking, Batman. We've got a nutcase on our hands.

[Outside the Institute]

(The Brigadier is checking the window cleaner. A man in a bowler hat and his aide come up.)
COOK: He's not dead?
BRIGADIER: No, he's still breathing.
COOK: Who is he?
BRIGADIER: Well, the window cleaner, I presume. He must have fallen off that ladder. It's a miracle he's still alive.
COOK: Oh, poor fellow. Well, come along, Proctor. I trust you'll make the necessary arrangements to get him into hospital.
(Cook and Proctor leave, Benton comes up. He's back in uniform.)
BRIGADIER: Of course, sir. Sergeant Benton?
BENTON: Sir?

[Road]

(The Doctor is driving Bessie along a country road.)
JO: It's a doomy old day. I mean, just look at that sky. Just look at it.
DOCTOR: Do stop wiffling, Jo, there's a good girl. We're not out on a pleasure jaunt, you know?
JO: Sorry, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Only, if it is the Master, we can't run the risk of losing him. You just keep your eye on the time sensor.
JO: Right.
(It promptly starts working.)
JO: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yeah?
JO: It's working again.
(The Doctor stops Bessie.)
DOCTOR: What's the bearing?
JO: Er, oh seven four, and, er, sixteen point three nine miles away.
DOCTOR: Well, that's Venusian miles. In Earth miles, that's be about seventy two point seven nine. Let's take a look at the map. Well, we're about here. That should put us somewhere around there. A village called Wootton.
JO: Wootton? Well, that's where the Brigadier and Sergeant Benton are.
DOCTOR: TOM-TIT? Well, if the Master's behind that. What time's the demonstration?
JO: Two o'clock.
DOCTOR: We've got to stop it. Hang on tight, Jo.
(The Doctor puts Bessie into Super Drive and off they rocket.)

[Newton Institute]

(One forty five according to the stable clock and lunch is over.)
COOK: There you are, Charles. It may seem churlish of me after eating your excellent lunch, but how the institute can afford pheasant, I really don't know.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

PERCIVAL: We are in the depths of the country, you know.
COOK: Be that as it may. We are responsible for international funds, public money. I doubt very much whether we should allow ourselves the luxury of either pheasants or TOM-TITS.
RUTH: Well, the Professor doesn't seem to be here, gentlemen.
PERCIVAL: Obviously.
(Hyde comes out of the radiation lab.)
RUTH: Ah, Stuart. Where's the professor?
HYDE: Search me. He was here a couple of minutes ago.
COOK: Who is this fellow Thascales, anyway? I've never heard of him.
PERCIVAL: Oh, an excellent background. Surely you've read his paper on the granule structure of time?
COOK: All I can do to keep up with the departmental minutes. I leave all the rest to Proctor.
BRIGADIER: That's a fearsome looking load of electronic nonsense you've got together, Doctor Ingram? How does it all work? In words of one syllable.
RUTH: I'll do my best. Well, gentleman, to begin with, time isn't smooth. It's made up of little bits.
HYDE: A series of minute present moments.
RUTH: That's it. Temporal atoms, so to speak. So, if one could push something through the interstices between them, it would be outside our space-time continuum altogether.
BRIGADIER: Where would it be then?
RUTH: Well, nowhere at all in ordinary terms.
BRIGADIER: You've lost me, Doctor Ingram.
COOK: And me. I've never heard such a farrago of unscientific rubbish in all my life. It's a impossible situation.
HYDE: But we've done it. We shoved that vase through and brought it back, in there.
BRIGADIER: But shoved it through where, for goodness sake?
BENTON: Sort of through the crack between now and now, sir.
HYDE: Right, you've got it.
BRIGADIER: Well I give up. It's beyond me.
(A figure in a radiation suit and helmet enters.)
MASTER: Then you must see for yourselves, gentlemen. I apologise for keeping you waiting. Shall we begin?

[Road]

JO: Doctor, slow down. It's not safe to drive so quickly. Please!
DOCTOR: Nonsense! It's perfectly safe. My reactions are ten times faster than yours. Bessie's no ordinary car, remember?
(Bessie comes to a sudden halt at a crossroads.)
DOCTOR: See what I mean?
JO: But why didn't I go through the windscreen?
DOCTOR: Well, the brakes work by the absorption of inertia, including yours.
(The time sensor starts up.)
JO: It's working again.
DOCTOR: Right, come on, Bessie, old girl. It's up to you now. 
(Bessie zooms into the Institute grounds.)

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(Ruth puts a blue and white pattern china cup and saucer on the sending plate.)
RUTH: Surely you don't need to wear anti-radiation gear, Professor?
MASTER: In case of an emergency, Doctor. I may have to join Mister Hyde in a hurry. Report, Mister Hyde?

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

HYDE: Interstitial activity nil.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

RUTH: Molecular structure stable. Four oh, four five, five oh.
MASTER: Increasing power.
RUTH: Isolate matrix scanner.
HYDE [OC]: Check.
RUTH: Six oh, six five, seven oh, seven five.
MASTER: Increasing power.
RUTH: It's gone into the second quadrant already, Professor.
MASTER: I know what I'm doing, Doctor. Initiating transfer now.
HYDE [OC]: Ten, nine, eight

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(The crystal glows brighter.)
HYDE: Seven, six, five

[Newton Institute laboratory]

HYDE [OC]: Four, three, two, one.
(The cup and saucer vanish.)

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

HYDE: I'm getting too much power. I can't hold it. Switch off!
(Hyde grabs his head.)

[Newton Institute laboratory]

RUTH: Turn it off, Professor! Turn it off!
(The Master takes the power higher.)
MASTER: Come, Kronos, come!

Episode Two

[Newton Institute laboratory]

RUTH: Stuart! No, no, wait, it's too dangerous. Professor!
(The Master is no longer in the room. Ruth fights to pull back the power levels.)

[Outside the Institute]

(Outside, the clock strikes a very slow two as Bessie comes to a sudden halt.)
DOCTOR: Right, Jo. Jo?
(Jo is staring at nothing.)
DOCTOR: Oh, good grief.
(The Doctor leaps out of Bessie and runs through an archway to the main building, slightly slower than usual. The Master watches him go inside.)

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Doctor enters.)
DOCTOR: Cut the power!
RUTH: I can't. It won't budge!
DOCTOR: Then reverse the polarity!
RUTH: What?
DOCTOR: Reverse the temporal polarity!
(Ruth pulls a module from the control panel and turns a unit around.)
BRIGADIER: Is it safe to go in?
RUTH: No, wait.
COOK: What is all this about?
BRIGADIER: Oh, for heaven's sake. There's a man in there.
(The power drops down quickly.)
RUTH: Right, the level should be all right now.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(The Brigadier enters.)
BRIGADIER: Doctor.
(A figure is slumped over the machine. It is an old man with sparse white hair.)
RUTH: Stuart!
COOK: If this meant to be some kind of a joke.
PERCIVAL: What on earth is going on?
DOCTOR: Who is this?
RUTH: My assistant. But Stuart's only twenty five.
DOCTOR: Twenty five? This man's eighty or more.
(Jo enters.)
JO: What's happening, Doctor? Are we too late?
DOCTOR: On the contrary, Jo, I think we're just in time.

[Hyde's apartment]

(In another part of the Institute. Ruth removes a thermometer from Hyde's mouth and looks at it. The Brigadier enters.)
BRIGADIER: How is he?
DOCTOR: Well, what he needs at the moment is rest. We'll get him to the hospital later. He must have been a pretty tough youngster.
RUTH: He was.
DOCTOR: Well, lucky for him. Otherwise the shock of the change would have finished him off.
JO: But will he be all right?
DOCTOR: Yes, he'll survive.
RUTH: Yes, but how long for, Doctor? He's an old man.
BRIGADIER: What caused it, Doctor, some sort of radioactivity?
DOCTOR: No, it was more than that.
JO: A change in metabolism?
DOCTOR: Well, that's more like it, Jo, but it still isn't the answer, even if the metabolic rate had increased a hundredfold.
RUTH: That's impossible.
DOCTOR: Well, of course it is. Even if it wasn't, the change in him would have taken seven or eight months, not eight seconds.
BRIGADIER: Well, there's only one thing I know which makes people old.
DOCTOR: And that is?
BRIGADIER: Anno Domini, Doctor. Age, the passing of time.
RUTH: We all know that.
DOCTOR: Congratulations, Brigadier. I think you've provided the explanation.
BRIGADIER: Well, glad to be of service. What did I say?
DOCTOR: The passing of time. That's the only possible answer. Stuart's own personal time speeded up so enormously that his whole physiological life passed by in a moment. But why? How did it happen?
RUTH: Well, the Professor might know but he seems to have disappeared.
JO: What professor?
RUTH: Professor Thascales. TOM-TIT's his baby.
DOCTOR: Thascales. Really, the arrogance of that man is beyond belief.
BRIGADIER: Well, whose arrogance? Doctor, I wish you wouldn't talk in riddles.
DOCTOR: Perhaps a classical education would have helped you, Brigadier. Thascales is a Greek word.
JO: Thascales? I get it. Thascales is Greek for Master.
DOCTOR: Right, Jo.
(Hyde moans.)
RUTH: He's coming round.
HYDE: Help me. Help.
JO: It's all right. it's all right. You're quite safe.
HYDE: No, nobody's safe. No one's safe. Oh, he's here, he's here. I saw him. I saw him.
RUTH: Oh, the poor boy's delirious.
HYDE: No, no, no
RUTH: Don't try to speak, Stu. Just rest.
DOCTOR: No, no, let him talk. Who did you see, Stuart? Answer me.
HYDE: Danger. The crystal.
RUTH: Please stop this, Doctor. Please.
DOCTOR: Look, answer me, Stuart. Who did you see?
BRIGADIER: Go easy, Doctor.
HYDE: No. No.
JO: Doctor, please.
DOCTOR: Be quiet, both of you. Now answer me. Who did you see? Answer me!
HYDE: The Kronos!
DOCTOR: Kronos! Yes, of course. I should have known. Doctor Ingram, I want you to come with me. I want you to tell me everything that you know about that machine of yours.
JO: Shall I come?
DOCTOR: No, no, you stay here with Stuart. Phone me immediately he starts talking again.
BRIGADIER: You'd better lock the door behind us, Miss Grant.
DOCTOR: Brigadier, don't hang about. I have a job for you too, you know.

[Brigadier's office]

YATES: Newton Institute Wootton. Got that, sir. Over.
BRIGADIER [OC]: (drowning in static) Get two sections over here right away. Over.
YATES: Say again, sir. I didn't quite get that. Over.

[Outside the Institute]

BRIGADIER: I said, bring some men with you. I feel as naked as a babe in his bath. I'll want light and heavy machine guns. Oh, and Yates? Shove a couple of anti-tank guns in the boot, will you? Over.
YATES [OC]: You've got tanks there, sir? Over.
BRIGADIER: You never know, Captain. You never know. Over.
YATES [OC]: Right, sir, and, er, when, sir? I mean, how soon? Over.
BRIGADIER: Oh, the usual, Captain Yates. About ten minutes ago. Oh, Yates? The Doctor wants you to bring his Tardis with you. All right? Over.
YATES [OC]: Right, sir. Out.
COOK: I'm sorry, Charles, but the whole thing smells of bad fish. We'll be well out of it.
PERCIVAL: But I'd stake my reputation on the professor's integrity.
COOK: You already have, Charles. You already have. A foolish gamble gone wrong. Now, it's not surprising that you lost.
PERCIVAL: Please, Humphrey!
COOK: I can see no alternative to a full Whitehall inquiry. I can only hope that we don't have to parade our dirty linen at Westminster, not to mention Brussels.
BRIGADIER: Forgive me. Mister Cook?
COOK: Doctor Cook.
BRIGADIER: I'm so sorry. Doctor Cook. I couldn't help overhearing what you said.
COOK: Well?
BRIGADIER: This affair's no longer in your hands, sir.
COOK: I beg your pardon?
BRIGADIER: It's now a security matter. I've taken over.
COOK: You have no right.
BRIGADIER: I'm sorry, sir, I've every right. Subsection 3A of the preamble to the Seventh Enabling Act. Paragraph 24G, if I remember rightly.
COOK: Oh.
BRIGADIER: So, bearing in mind the Official Secrets Act as well, you'll please make certain that you say not a word about today's events to anybody. Either of you.
PROCTOR: That's all very well, but
COOK: Be quiet, Proctor. You can't possible have sufficient grounds for such high-handed behaviour.
BRIGADIER: This man, Thascales, is a dangerous criminal and an escaped prisoner. Sufficient grounds?
COOK: Oh, well, er, yes. Come along, Proctor, don't stand about. You'll be hearing from us, Charles.
(Cook and Proctor get into the official car and it drives off.)
BRIGADIER: Oh, excuse me, sir. Doctor Percival?
PERCIVAL: Yes? What?
BRIGADIER: You feeling quite well, sir?
PERCIVAL: Yes, yes, of course I am. Oh, this whole matter is a shock, but. What did you want?
BRIGADIER: I'd like this whole place evacuated of all but essential personnel at once, please.
PERCIVAL: I can't think, Brigadier, you have the slightest idea of what you're asking. There are projects in train
BRIGADIER: I'm sorry, sir, but it's absolutely necessary. Now Sergeant Benton will keep an eye on this machine of yours until the troops arrive, but I cannot be held responsible for the consequences unless you do as I ask.
PERCIVAL: Brigadier, you may enjoy playing at soldiers
BRIGADIER: By three o'clock, please, Doctor Percival. And if the Master contacts you, don't try to hold onto him. Just let me know at once.
PERCIVAL: Who?
BRIGADIER: I'm sorry. Of course, I mean the Professor.
PERCIVAL: But he'll be miles away by now.
BRIGADIER: I doubt it. There's no reason why he should know we're onto him. He'll be back.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(There is a knock on the door. Benton unlocks it to let Ruth and the Doctor in.)
DOCTOR: Any trouble?
BENTON: I've been a bit lonely, but that's all.
DOCTOR: Good, good.
RUTH: But, Doctor, why won't you explain?
DOCTOR: Because I must find out whether I'm right, that's why. Now where's the crystal?
RUTH: It's through here.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

RUTH: There.
(The Doctor takes the cover of TOM-TIT and looks at the crystal.)
DOCTOR: The crystal of Kronos. So I am right.
RUTH: Kronos? Well, that's what Stuart said. Look, Doctor, what is all this about?
DOCTOR: Well, it'll be difficult to accept, I warn you.
RUTH: Well, try me.
DOCTOR: Well, luckily you are already familiar with the idea of stepping outside of space-time.
RUTH: I've lived with the concept for months.
DOCTOR: And I've lived with it for many long years. I've been there.
RUTH: You have?
DOCTOR: Yes, I have. Strange place it is, too. A place that is no place. A dangerous place where creatures love beyond your wildest imagination. Kronovores, time eaters. They swallow a life as quickly as a boa constrictor can swallow a rabbit, fur and all.
RUTH: Are you saying that Kronos is one of these creatures?
DOCTOR: I am. The most fearsome of the lot.

[Director's office]

(The Master is settled into a large leather wing chair, drinking brandy and smoking a cigar whilst working.)
PERCIVAL: You! What're you doing here?
MASTER: Now don't panic. Shut the door and come here.
PERCIVAL: But they'll find you.
MASTER: Not if you keep your head. Why should they look for me here anyway? Look, don't fidget, please.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

RUTH: But Kronos was a Greek legend. He was the Titan who ate his children, wasn't he?
DOCTOR: Yes, exactly. And what's more, one of those children in the legend was Poseidon, the god of Atlantis.
RUTH: Are you trying to tell us that the classical gods are real?
DOCTOR: Well, yes and no. Extraordinary people, the Atlanteans, you know. Even more extraordinary than their cousins in Athens. Once reality became unbearable for them, they would invent a legend to tame it.
RUTH: You mean like the legend of Kronos.
DOCTOR: Quite so. Kronos, a living creature, was drawn at a time by the priests of Atlantis, using that crystal as its centre.
RUTH: You mean, that that crystal is the original? The actual crystal from Atlantis?
DOCTOR: It is, and your friend the professor, is trying to use that crystal, as it was used four thousand years ago, to capture the Kronavore.
RUTH: So that's what you meant when you talked of terrible danger.
BENTON: Danger to us, you mean, Doctor, or to the whole world?
DOCTOR: Not just danger to our world, Sergeant, or even our galaxy, but to the entire created universe.

[Director's office]

PERCIVAL: But suppose somebody should walk in here now and find me talking to you.
MASTER: Oh dear, you are a worrier, aren't you. Come here. Closer. Now look into my eyes. There is nothing to worry about. Everything will be all right if you just obey me. Just obey me.
PERCIVAL: Obey. I must obey. Everything will be all right.
MASTER: That's better. Now you go along there and carry along with your telephoning, and let me get on with my sums. You know, it's a long time since I came across a hypnotic subject who turned out to be as good as you are. It's just like old times.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

DOCTOR: There are two things I don't quite understand, though. One is the massive power build up that you had, and the second is the strength of the signal that I received on the time sensor.
RUTH: Yes, but you said yourself it picks up all time field disturbances.
DOCTOR: Yes, indeed it does. The strength of the signal was far too strong for an apparatus as crude as this. However. Ah.
BENTON: Well, what is it, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes. Well, I thought it would be around here somewhere.
(The Doctor points to a large mainframe computer unit that fills a whole wall.)
DOCTOR: This, Sergeant, is the Master's Tardis.

[Director's office]

MASTER: E to the power of seven C. E equals MC cubed.
PERCIVAL: Squared. (into phone) Er, yes, thank you. At once.
MASTER: What?
PERCIVAL: E equals MC squared, not cubed.
MASTER: Not in the extra-temporal physics of the time vortex. Oh dear, now you've made me lose my place. You're an interfering dolt, Percival.
PERCIVAL: I am sorry. What are you doing?
MASTER: Oh dear, I am trying to find out why we had that massive power build-up. It makes the whole experiment uncontrollable, even the filter didn't prevent it and logically, it just shouldn't happen.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

DOCTOR: Logically, it just shouldn't happen.
RUTH: But it did.
DOCTOR: Yes, indeed it did. So, there's only one thing left for us to do. Wouldn't you agree, Sergeant?
BENTON: Oh, yes, sure. What, for instance?
DOCTOR: Switch on, and take a look for ourselves.
RUTH: Right.
DOCTOR: It's reading ten already.
RUTH: But that's impossible!
BENTON: Doctor? Doctor, the crystal's glowing.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

DOCTOR: Sergeant, now you're a strong young man. Go in there and pick up that crystal, will you?
BENTON: Doctor, Stuart was
DOCTOR: It's perfectly safe at this low level. Believe me.
BENTON: If you say so, Doctor.
DOCTOR: I do.
(Benton goes over to the machine and takes hold of the crystal.)
BENTON: It's fixed down.
DOCTOR: No, it isn't, you know. You can see it isn't.
BENTON: Well, I can't shift it.
DOCTOR: No. No, of course you can't. And do you know why you can't shift it? Because that crystal isn't really here at all. It's made the jump through interstitial time. It must to be linked to that other crystal all those thousands of years ago. Or rather it is the other crystal.
RUTH: But then where is the original one?
DOCTOR: Where do you think? In Atlantis, of course.

[Temple of Poseidon]

(Lightning splits the night sky.)
NEOPHITE: Holiness! Holiness! Come quickly! The crystal is afire!
(As the boy cowers on the mosaic floor, the priest in the long white robe and pink cape goes over to the altar and gazes at the pulsing crystal.) KRASIS: At last. At last, Kronos, the time is come, and I await your call.
(As the priest lifts his arms, he is watched by a young man with kohl-ringed eyes, who is hiding behind a column.)

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The telephone rings.)
BENTON [OC]: Excuse me, Doctor.
(Benton enters and answers it.)
BENTON: Sergeant Benton? Ah, hello, Miss Grant. Yeah. Yeah, he's here. Oh, I see. Look, hang on a sec. Doctor?
(The Doctor enters.)
BENTON: Doctor, it's Jo. She says Stuart Hyde's coming to. He's in a bit of a state, it seems.
DOCTOR: All right. Tell her that I'm on my way. You'd better stay here, Sergeant.
BENTON: Right.
DOCTOR: Coming, Ruth? Er, Doctor Ingram?
RUTH: Ruth will do.
BENTON: Hello, Jo?

[Hyde's apartment]

JO: It's all right, I heard. Well, no, not scared exactly. Just a bit, well, you know, churned up. Yeah, and a merry Michaelmas to you too.
HYDE: Kronos.
JO: Oh lor, I'm forgetting my patient. See you, Sergeant.
HYDE: Kronos.
JO: Are you all right?
HYDE: I felt him coming back.
JO: Who?
HYDE: Kronos. Oh, don't let him touch me.
JO: It's all right. You're all right.
HYDE: Oh, I'm burning. I'm burning.
JO: You're quite safe, honestly. Shush, shush. You're safe.
HYDE: Who are you?
JO: I'm Jo.
HYDE: Oh, where am I?
JO: You're in your own room.
HYDE: Oh, I've got the granddaddy of all hangovers. My hands. What's happened to my hands?
JO: It's all right. It's all right, honestly. It's a difficult thing to
HYDE: A mirror.
JO: There isn't one.
HYDE: Give me a mirror.
JO: Please, I'll get you one later. Come on, now just lie down and
(Hyde gets a shaving mirror from the bedside cabinet and sees the truth.)
HYDE: Oh, no. No. No.

[Director's office]

MASTER: Oh oh three five seven. Point oh oh three five seven. Good.
PERCIVAL: You've finished?
MASTER: Yes, at last. Now, back to the laboratory.
PERCIVAL: Yes, well, they'll have somebody on guard.
MASTER: Oh, yes. You don't happen to know who it is, do you?
PERCIVAL: Yes, a Sergeant Benton, I think.
MASTER: Really? Well, I think I know how to deal with him.

[Hyde's apartment]

HYDE: It was just after the cup and saucer appeared. I was about to switch off when it happened.
DOCTOR: Go on, old chap. Go on, you're doing fine.
HYDE: Like a tongue of flame. All my body was on fire. All my life, all my energy, was being sucked out of me.
DOCTOR: Why did you say Kronos?
HYDE: Because that's who it was.
DOCTOR: How did you know?
HYDE: I just knew.
RUTH: You mean you heard a voice or something?
HYDE: No, I just knew.
DOCTOR: It's a race memory. We all have them.
JO: But what is Kronos? Or should I say who?
DOCTOR: Later, Jo, later. Go on, Stuart, what else?
HYDE: Nothing else until I woke up here. Doc, am I really an old man? Is there nothing you can do, or am I stuck like this?
DOCTOR: I'm sorry, Stuart. I just don't know. But I promise you that we'll do everything we possibly can to help you.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The phone rings.)
BENTON: Hello?
PERCIVAL [OC]: Hello. Is that Sergeant Benton?
BENTON: Yes.
PERCIVAL [OC]: This is the director. The Brigadier wishes to see you back at the house.
BENTON: But I don't get it. The Brigadier wants me back at the house?
PERCIVAL [OC]: Yes, that's right. At once.
BENTON: Yes, but that means leaving the lab unwatched.

[Director's office]

PERCIVAL: Oh, but he said to be sure to lock up. Those were his very words.

 [Newton Institute laboratory]

BENTON: I don't know, Doctor Percival. I mean, you've put me in a bit of a spot. The Brigadier told me to stay here no matter what happened. He'll have my stripes if I don't.

[Director's office]

PERCIVAL: One minute.
MASTER: What's the matter?
PERCIVAL: I don't think he believes me.
MASTER: I'm not surprised. I've never seen a more inept performance. Look, tell him to ring the Brigadier for confirmation.
PERCIVAL: But you can't
MASTER: Do as I tell you!
PERCIVAL: Sergeant Benton? I suggest you check with Brigadier Stewart yourself. Er, oh, you want his number? Er.
(The Master picks up the second extension telephone for Percival to read the number.)
PERCIVAL: Oh yes, I think you can contact him on five three four. Yeah. Yes, that's right.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

PERCIVAL [OC]: Goodbye.
BENTON: Goodbye.

[Director's office]

(The Master answers the second telephone with a perfect imitation of the Brigadier.)
MASTER: Lethbridge Stewart?
BENTON [OC]: Hello, Sergeant Benton here, sir.
MASTER: Ah, Benton.
BENTON: Sir, I've just had the most peculiar phone call.
MASTER: Nothing peculiar about it, my dear fellow. Perfectly simple. I need you over here, on the double.
BENTON [OC]: Right, sir.
(Benton opens a sash window in the laboratory then goes out of the main door.)
MASTER: Well?
PERCIVAL: No sign of him. Do you think he really will. Ah, there he is.
(Benton walks through the archway and past Bessie, away from the main block.)
PERCIVAL: It worked! It really worked!
MASTER: Of course it worked. Now see if the corridor's clear.
PERCIVAL: Not a soul, Professor.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(Benton walks round the stable block then gets up onto the flat roof near the laboratory window. From there he climbs across to the open window and goes into the lab. He crosses the room and looks out at the main block in time to see Percival and the Master come out. Benton draws his pistol and hides behind TOM-TIT as he hears voices in the corridor. Percival and the Master enter.)
PERCIVAL: These are trying times.
MASTER: Time? Soon I shall have the time in the world, literally.
PERCIVAL: In an hour or so, the place will be swarming with soldiers.
MASTER: Doctor Percival, you're beginning to irritate me. Now do be quiet. I tell you that nobody and nothing can stop me now.
(Benton sneaks round the machinery and then comes out in front of the door.)
BENTON: Put your hands in the air, both of you. Get them up. Now turn around slowly. Slowly.
MASTER: Well, well, well. The resourceful Sergeant Benton.
BENTON: You didn't really think you could fool me with a fake telephone call, did you? It's the oldest trick in the book.
MASTER: I underestimated you, Sergeant. How did you know?
BENTON: Simple. The Brigadier's not in the habit of calling Sergeants my dear fellow.
MASTER: Ah. The tribal taboos of army etiquette. I find it difficult to identify with such primitive absurdities.
BENTON: Yes, well, primitive or not, mate, you're still in the soup without a ladle, aren't you.
MASTER: Now, Sergeant, you must let me explain.
BENTON: Keep back! Keep back.
MASTER: Yes, of course.
BENTON: Keep back.
MASTER: Of course, Sergeant. You see, Sergeant Benton, the whole point is that. Doctor! What a very timely
(Benton looks behind him and the Master grabs his gun arm, making him drop the pistol and throwing him to the floor. Benton hits his head against a filing cabinet and is out for the count.)
MASTER: You're wrong, Sergeant Benton. That is the oldest trick in the book.
PERCIVAL: What are you going to do?
MASTER: I am going to bring somebody here who can help me find the power that I need. Without it, I am helpless.
(The Master starts to operate TOM-TIT.)
PERCIVAL: I don't understand.
MASTER: Of course you don't understand! How could you possibly understand? Only one thing stands between me and complete power over the Earth, over the universe itself. Now the one I bring here will show me how to harness that power. Now, you watch that crystal!
(The crystal glows.)

[Temple of Poseidon]

KRASIS: Lord of life, give me of thy power. Oh, mighty Kronos, lord of death, give me thy power! Oh, mighty Kronos, lord of life, give me thy strength!
(Lighting crashes.)
KRASIS: Mighty lord, exalted one. I hear and obey!
(More lightning, and Krasis vanishes.)

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(Benton wakes up. He sees the Master and Percival staring into the radiation lab at the bright crystal. Then Krasis appears)

Episode Three

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(The Master enters as TOM-TIT powers down.)
MASTER: Welcome! Welcome!
KRASIS: I am Krasis, High Priest of the temple of Poseidon in Atlantis.
MASTER: Poseidon? But surely Kronos is your lord?
KRASIS: You would dare profane, with your irreverent tongue, the great secret, the mystery which no man dare speak? Who are you?
MASTER: I am the Master. Lord of time and ruler of Kronos.
KRASIS: You are lying! No one rules Kronos!
MASTER: I shall, with your help.
KRASIS: You
MASTER: And together we shall become masters of the universe.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(Benton runs out of the room.)
PERCIVAL: Professor!
MASTER: Oh, let him go. He can do us no harm now. Come with me.
KRASIS: Is this the abode of lord Kronos?
MASTER: No, but with you to assist me, I shall bring him here.
KRASIS: I exist only to do his will. He is not to be commanded.
MASTER: Oh, but surely Kronos obeyed the priests of Kronos as a pet dog obeys his master?
KRASIS: You
MASTER: The truth, Krasis?
KRASIS: It is so written.
MASTER: Ah. Well, therefore you have the secret. You have the formula.
KRASIS: No, it is lost. For five centuries it has been lost to Atlantis.
MASTER: Was nothing handed down?
KRASIS: Nothing.
MASTER: Nothing at all?
KRASIS: Nothing, save the crystal and the seal of the high priest.
MASTER: But that's it! From this seal, I can learn the true constants! Kronos is in my power at last.

[Outside the Institute]

(Hyde is wheeled out to an ambulance.)
DOCTOR: Rest. That's all you need at the moment, until your body recovers from the shock.
HYDE: A charming prospect, I must say. Hey, Ruth? You'd better find out about my old age pension. After all, I'll be twenty six in seven weeks time.
RUTH: Try not to be too bitter, Stu.
HYDE: Huh.
BENTON: Doctor?
JO: Sergeant Benton.
BENTON: Doctor, it's the Master. He's there in the laboratory.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Master is examining the Atlantean seal with its design of concentric circles on the right with a straight line going left from their centre and an ellipse turning to the bottom, and a vertical dividing line down the middle of the seal.)
PERCIVAL: But how can Atlantean measurements mean anything to you?
MASTER: Comparative ratios remain constant throughout time. If you have nothing intelligent to say, do please keep quiet. Right. Now we switch on.

[Outside the Institute]

DOCTOR: Are you sure he said he was from Atlantis?
BENTON: Yes, he just appeared from nowhere.
BRIGADIER: Right, what are we waiting for? Benton, Doctor, on the double! Females stay under cover. Right, Miss Grant?
DOCTOR: Brigadier, wait!
RUTH: Hey, wait for me. Females indeed.
(Ruth runs after the Brigadier and Benton.)
JO: Doctor, look!
(Hyde is getting younger again.)
DOCTOR: A massive feedback of time. Jo, it's too late. Kronos is coming.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Master cranks TOM-TIT up to maximum power.)
MASTER: Come, Kronos, come!
(In the radiation lab, the crystal glows then a dove appears which rapidly turns into -)
MASTER: Kronos, welcome!
(what is effectively a flying man dressed all in white flapping long sleeves like wings. It pounces on Percival who is standing in the doorway.)
PERCIVAL: No!
(Percival vanishes.)
MASTER: Kronos, be at peace. I am your friend!
KRASIS: You will never control Kronos! He is the ruler of time! He is the destroyer! We are doomed!
MASTER: Rubbish! Kronos, hear me! I order you to obey!
(The Master holds up the seal and Kronos backs away.)
MASTER: Well, well, well. So the pet dog does obey him master, eh? Right, you stay in your kennel until I have need of you.
(The Master shuts Kronos in the radiation lab.)

[Outside the Institute]

(Time is running slow near the laboratory block.)
DOCTOR: Just as I thought. They've run right into trouble. Jo, you stay here.
(The Doctor runs over to Ruth and brings her back to the ambulance. Hyde is back to his youthful self.)
DOCTOR: She'll be all right now she's outside the limit.
JO: What's the matter with them?
(The Doctor runs to the Brigadier and Benton.)
RUTH: What's happening?
JO: Are you all right?
RUTH: What's going on?
JO: Don't worry. The Doctor'll explain later. I hope.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Master is adjusting TOM-TIT's controls as Kronos flies around the radiation lab like an angry albino crow.)
KRASIS: What are you doing?
MASTER: Reversing the interstitial flow. Now don't interrupt me. I've got to concentrate.
KRASIS: You have not the power to control him!
MASTER: I shall have, never fear. Just give me time. Now, I must put him back where he belongs.

[Outside the Institute]

(The Doctor retrieves the Brigadier, who was basically running slowly on the spot.)
BRIGADIER: What, what, what on Earth, Doctor? Will you please kindly explain in
DOCTOR: There's really no time to explain now. Benton, take the chair. Everybody inside. Quick.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(Kronos goes back into the crystal. The Master mops his brow.)
MASTER: Right, it's safe to go in now, most noble high priest.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

MASTER: Thank you for your help.
KRASIS: I am no slave that I should serve you. I serve only the gods.
MASTER: You'll serve me, Krasis, and you'll like it.
KRASIS: You dare mock the high priest?
MASTER: Take care. I can always bring Kronos back, you know.
KRASIS: No! No, I beseech you. What is your will?
MASTER: Knowledge. Your knowledge of the ancient mysteries. Why could I not control him?
KRASIS: For all your sorcery, you are as a child trying to control a rogue elephant. A puny child.
MASTER: But I have the crystal.
KRASIS: That crystal is but a part of the true crystal of Kronos. A small fraction.
MASTER: Fraction? And the rest is in Atlantis?
KRASIS: Deep in the vaults of the temple of Poseidon, guarded by night and by day from such thieves as you. You may command the slave but never shall you command the Mighty One himself.
MASTER: You think not? We shall see.

[Temple of Poseidon]

(The young man returns to the altar with a white haired old man.)
HIPPIAS: Do you see, most venerable king? The crystal has gone.
DALIOS: And Krasis?
HIPPIAS: I was here. The sky opened and a sphere of fire hurled by the hand of Zeus
DALIOS: Yes, yes, yes, I saw the thunderstorm myself. What next?
HIPPIAS: They disappeared, Krasis and the crystal together like smoke. What does it mean, Lord Dalios? Has the time come at last?
DALIOS: You are young, Hippias. As young in years as in the sacred mysteries. What do you know of Kronos?
HIPPIAS: The years of Kronos were the golden years of Atlantis. Perhaps he will return to us.
DALIOS: That is my fear. Our world is in great danger. Come!

[Temple Undercroft]

DALIOS: How old would you think me, boy?
HIPPIAS: A great age, Dalios.
DALIOS: How great?
HIPPIAS: Four score years or more, perhaps.
DALIOS: A stripling of eighty summers? No, Hippias, when these eyes were clear like yours, I saw the building of the temple. I was a witness at the enthronement of the image of the great god Poseidon himself.
HIPPIAS: But, that was, well, it must have been five hundred years ago.
DALIOS: Five hundred and thirty seven.
HIPPIAS: Dalios, will you have me believe you are
DALIOS: I am.
(Dalios unbolts a large wooden door and opens it. A bright light shine inside.)
HIPPIAS: What is it, that light?
DALIOS: It is the light of true crystal of Kronos. This is the great secret, the veritable mystery. But now that Krasis has gone, you alone know the secret. You must guard it with your life.
HIPPIAS: I shall, my lord.
(The sound of a bull bellowing comes from the room.)
DALIOS: There is nothing to fear, it is the guardian. Return to your rest! It is I, Dalios!
(Dalios closes the door and bolts it again.)
HIPPIAS: What, who was it? You said no other person shares the great mystery.
DALIOS: The guardian is a person no longer. A thing, a creature, too horrible to imagine. Half man, half beast. Come.

[Hyde's apartment]

HYDE: Make yourselves comfortable, if you can.
DOCTOR: Thank you.
BRIGADIER: All right, Doctor, go on. What next. Having picked us all up by the scruff of the neck and bundled us all in here, what do you propose to do with us?
DOCTOR: Nothing at all. There's nothing to be done except wait.
JO: I seem to have heard that before.
DOCTOR: Speaking personally, I'd love a cup of tea. How about it, Stuart?
HYDE: I'll put the kettle on. Hey, Ruth, get the mugs out.
RUTH: Right.
HYDE: How about a sandwich? Only marmalade, I'm afraid.
BENTON: I'd love one, please.
BRIGADIER: This isn't a picnic. One moment you're talking about the entire universe blowing up, and the next you're going on about tea. Doctor! What's happening?
DOCTOR: A great deal. For instance, you, Brigadier, you were caught in a hiatus in time. Being without becoming. An ontological absurdity.
BRIGADIER: I don't understand a word you're saying.
JO: Well, it's true. You and Benton and Doctor Ingram, well, you were, you were stuck.
BRIGADIER: Nothing of the sort, Miss Grant.
DOCTOR: Well, you wouldn't be aware of it, of course, because your time had slowed down too.
BENTON: And all because of this TOM-TIT gadget?
DOCTOR: Yes, so it would seem. After all, it did make a crack in time, didn't it?
JO: A what?
BRIGADIER: Oh, a gap between the now and the now, as Sergeant Benton put it.
DOCTOR: Yes, exactly. We're bound to experience all kinds of freak side effects.
RUTH: You mean, even leaving Kronos and the crystal right out of it?
DOCTOR: Correct.
RUTH: Marmalade sandwich?
DOCTOR: No, thank you. Jo?
RUTH: Well, why weren't we affected when we were actually working the machine? I mean, we weren't slowed down.
DOCTOR: Well, you stand right under a fountain, you don't necessarily get wet, do you?
RUTH: Oh, I see.
BRIGADIER: Well, I'm dashed if I do. Doctor, what are you doing?
DOCTOR: Me? Collecting.
(The Doctor is holding a napkin in a ring.)

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Master comes out of his Tardis, having changed into his usual black suit and gloves.)
MASTER: Right! Now we shall soon be ready to move.
KRASIS: Master, he may return. The Mighty One may return.
MASTER: Oh, fortunate Atlantis, to be blessed with such a courageous high priest. Never fear. Kronos will only return if I desire it.
KRASIS: But the crystal.
MASTER: I am reversing the interstitial flow, thus draining the time energy from the crystal. Otherwise, we couldn't take it with us.
KRASIS: We? Where are we going?
MASTER: Where do you think? Atlantis, of course.

[Hyde's apartment]

(The Doctor drops the napkin and ring, a set of keys and a couple of other things onto the bed.)
DOCTOR: Well, he must be stopped.
BRIGADIER: Fair enough. Why don't we get on with it?
DOCTOR: Because we can't even find out what he's up to without the Tardis. A bottle. I need a bottle.
HYDE: How about this?
(A milk bottle)
DOCTOR: No, no, that won't do. One with a narrow neck. A wine bottle.
HYDE: Moroccan burgundy, for instance?
DOCTOR: Yes, that'll do nicely.
HYDE: There we are.
DOCTOR: Fine. And the cork?
HYDE: Oh, you've got me there, I'm afraid.
RUTH: How about this, Stu?
HYDE: Oh, remarkable efficiency. Still on the corkscrew.
DOCTOR: Well done.
BRIGADIER: Doctor, I must insist. What are you up to?
DOCTOR: Delaying tactics, Brigadier. A small fly in the Master's metaphorical ointment.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

MASTER: Right, nearly there.
KRASIS: The fire is dying. You are indeed the Master.

[Hyde's apartment]

(The wine bottle has a cork back in it with a bodkin needle sticking up out of it. The Doctor is putting two forks into another cork.)
DOCTOR: Do give me a fork, Jo, will you?
(The Doctor puts the second cork on the needle.)
DOCTOR: Right. So far, so good.
RUTH: Another nutcase.
HYDE: Fruit cake standard.
JO: You just wait and see.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(The Master is dismantling the section holding the crystal.)
MASTER: Right, Krasis, you'll have to help me to carry it.
KRASIS: No! No, I dare not.
MASTER: But there's nothing to be afraid of, I promise you. Do as I tell you.
KRASIS: Master, do not compel me, I beseech you.

[Hyde's apartment]

(The corkscrew is now on top of the second cork, with the napkin ring holding its arms up and an upturned ashtray at the top with key fobs below. The Doctor hangs sets of rings off the forks.)
BRIGADIER: And what's that meant to be?
DOCTOR: You're a philistine, Brigadier. It's not meant to be anything. It just is. I hope.
RUTH: You mean it's just a ridiculous piece of modern art?
DOCTOR: No, certainly not. It's a time flow analogue.
HYDE: Of course it is, Ruth. You should have seen that at a glance.
DOCTOR: The relationships between the different molecular bonds and the actual shapes form a crystalline structure of ratios.
BRIGADIER: Does this make any sort of sense, Doctor Ingram?
RUTH: None whatsoever.
BRIGADIER: Just as I thought. Doctor, please stop this silly game at once.
DOCTOR: Patience, Brigadier, patience. Now then, here goes.
(The Doctor pushes a fork and the contraption spins.)
DOCTOR: Oh dear.
JO: What's up?
DOCTOR: Well, it doesn't work.
BRIGADIER: You astound me.
HYDE: Bad luck, Doc. Have a cup of tea and drown your sorrows.
DOCTOR: Thank you. Tea! Yes, of course. Tea leaves.
(The Doctor empties the mug and places it on top of the ashtray.)
DOCTOR: Tea leaves.

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

MASTER: I give you my firm pledge, Krasis. The crystal is totally inactive.
KRASIS: It, it looks dead.
MASTER: Well, of course it is. I promise you.
(The Master removes the cover and Krasis reaches for the crystal.)

[Hyde's apartment]

DOCTOR: Right, here we go.
(The Doctor sets it spinning again and the napkin rings pulses with light.)

[Newton Institute radiation laboratory]

(Krasis snatches his hand back.)
KRASIS: No! No, the crystals afire! The great one comes again!
MASTER: The meddling fool!

[Hyde's apartment]

JO: But what does it do? I mean, how does it actually affect the Master's plans.
DOCTOR: Well, it's just like jamming a radio signal, Jo. We used to make them at school to spoil each other's time experiments.
RUTH: I don't believe it. I just don't believe it.
(The Master pushes TOM-TIT's power lever and the tower goes bang.)
RUTH: Oh!
DOCTOR: Ah, well. It was fun while it lasted.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(A convoy is bringing the Tardis along a road. The Master carries in the section containing the crystal when a voice comes over his wrist communicator.)
YATES [OC]: Greyhound. Greyhound. This is Greyhound Three. Over.
BRIGADIER [OC]: Greyhound Three, Greyhound. Thank you, Captain Yates. And where have you been? Over.
YATES [OC]: Greyhound Three. Won't be long now, sir. About ten miles or so. Over.
BRIGADIER [OC]: Greyhound. Get your skates on, will you? We need the Doctor's Tardis here double quick. Out.
YATES [OC]: Greyhound Three. Wilco. Out.
KRASIS: Images that move and speak. Wagons but no oxen to draw them. This is indeed a time of wonders.
MASTER: I will show you greater wonders than either.
KRASIS: Master Lord, you will not bring the Mighty One here once more.
MASTER: Certainly not. I will just give you a demonstration of my power over time. Now, you watch this carefully.

[Road]

(A knight in full jousting armour carrying a lance and riding a caparisoned horse appears on a bridge in front of the convoy. It charges.)
YATES: Look out!
(The convoy scatters onto the fields either side of the road as the knight gallops off down the road.)
YATES: Greyhound Three? We're stuck in the mud. Forced off the road by some goon in fancy dress. I think. Over.

[Hyde's apartment]

BRIGADIER: Are you suffering from hallucinations, Captain Yates, or have you been drinking? Over.

[Road]

YATES: I could do with one, I don't mind telling you. This character in armour just galloped at us. You know, sir, the King Arthur bit. Then he vanished.

[Hyde's apartment]

BRIGADIER: In a puff of blue smoke, I suppose. You have been drinking!

[Newton Institute laboratory]

MASTER: And that, Captain Yates, was just a sample.

[Road]

YATES: Right, Sergeant, get a shift on. I want to get out of here.
SERGEANT: Right, lads, everybody out!
YATES: Right, Sergeant. Get your
(A bullet rips the tarpaulin over the back of Yate's Land Rover. By the river, a troop of Civil War Roundheads reload their muskets and their cannon.)
SERGEANT: Look, sir.
YATES: Hey! What do you think you're up to?
(The cannon is fired.)
YATES: Get down! Blithering idiot means it.
(UNIT returns fire.)
YATES: Greyhound? Greyhound? Over.

[Hyde's apartment]

BRIGADIER: I'm listening, Captain Yates. Over.
YATES: Another hallucination, sir. Roundheads attacking us with ball ammunition.
(Weapons fire can be clearly heard.)
YATES: Cannon balls, in fact. Out.
BRIGADIER: Captain Yates, if this is some sort of a joke, I
DOCTOR: Believe me, Brigadier, this is no kind of a joke. This is deadly serious.
BRIGADIER: All right, Doctor, you tell me what's going on.
DOCTOR: Well, don't you see? Roundheads? Horsemen in armour? The Master's using that crystal to bring them back in time.
BRIGADIER: So why don't we get over there and stop him.
DOCTOR: Because it would be suicide to go anywhere without the protection of the Tardis.
BENTON: And that's stuck in the mud being battered by a load of Roundheads.
DOCTOR: We'd better go and fetch it. Come on. Come on, Jo. Brigadier, are you coming?
BRIGADIER: Yes. Sergeant Benton, you'd better stay here. If the Master shows his face, you know what to do.
BENTON: Yes, sir.
RUTH: Can I come, Brigadier?
HYDE: I've always fancied myself as a bit of a cavalier.
BRIGADIER: Sorry, you'd better stay here with the Sergeant.
RUTH: But Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: You're the only people who can handle that infernal machine, apart from the Doctor. I must ask you to place yourself under the Sergeant's command. Both of you. Right?
(The Brigadier follows the Doctor and Jo out.)
RUTH: Full of old world charm, isn't he?

[Outside the Institute]

(The Doctor and Jo are waiting in Bessie.)
DOCTOR: Do buck up, Lethbridge Stewart.
BRIGADIER: Sorry, Doctor, a matter of some urgency. Better go under my own steam. Cheers. See you there. Try not to be far behind.
(The Brigadier gets into his Land Rover and drives off. The Doctor puts Bessie into Super Drive and rapidly overtakes him.)

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Master and Krasis watch the UNIT men being pinned down by the Roundheads.)
KRASIS: But why? Do you fear this machine so much?
MASTER: I fear nothing. It's just that I intend to go to Atlantis and I don't want my enemy to follow us. Now get on with it, you seventeenth century poltroons.
(Yates runs forward to a gatepost and lobs a grenade at the Roundheads. They vanish and the grenade goes bang.)
MASTER: I could have told you that wouldn't work, Captain Yates. Now stand by to duck, for here comes the grand finale.
(A WW2 flying bomb appears.)

[Hyde's apartment]

RUTH: What's that?
HYDE: It sounds like a motorbike.
BENTON: Yeah, but it's coming from the sky.

[Road]

JO: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Mmm?
JO: There's something wrong with the engine.
DOCTOR: Never. Why?
JO: Well, listen. There's a funny noise.
(The Doctor stops and the Brigadier pulls up alongside.)
DOCTOR: Oh, no.
BRIGADIER: What's up?
DOCTOR: Listen.
BRIGADIER: It can't be!
DOCTOR: Oh yes, it can. Displaced in time, but that's real enough. That's a V1.
JO: What?
DOCTOR: A V1, a doodlebug, a buzzbomb. The Germans used them towards the end of the Hitler war.
JO: Well, what did they do?
BRIGADIER: Blew up sizeable chunks of London. If that engine cuts out, then fall flat on your face because that'll mean its on the way down.
JO: Look, there's the convoy.
(Yates has got them moving again.)
BRIGADIER: Greyhound Three, Greyhound Three. Can you hear me, Captain Yates? Over.
YATES [OC]: Greyhound Three, I can only just hear you. Over.
BRIGADIER: Yates, that thing is a bomb and its on its way to you. Over!
YATES [OC]: Say again, say again. I cannot read you. Over.
(The Master presses a few buttons and the countryside goes quiet.)
DOCTOR: Jo, out of the car. Get down.
BRIGADIER: Yates, get out of it, man! It's a bomb! It's a bomb! Get out of it, Yates!
(The convoy is out of sight behind a line of trees.)
YATES [OC]: All right, lads, it's a bomb! Dive!
(KaBOOM and a piece of debris flies of into the air.)
BRIGADIER: Yates? Yates, can you hear me? Can you hear me? Can you hear me? Over! Mike, can you hear me?

Episode Four

[Hyde's apartment]

BENTON: Brigadier, come in, please. Greyhound Three, come in! Captain Yates, can you hear me, sir? Over.
It's no good. I just can't raise them. They must have copped it!

[Copse]

(There is a lot of smoke and a sizable crater in the soil. The Tardis is lying against the slope. Soldiers are helping their comrades out of the hole.)
FARMER: What happened then?
SERGEANT: I don't know. Some sort of explosion.
FARMER: Ar, I heard it. Funny that. It was just about here where that doodlebug fell. Back in 1944, that were.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

MASTER: You know, I thoroughly enjoyed that.
(The Master turns off TOM-TIT.)
KRASIS: You have destroyed this, this Tardis?
MASTER: No, it can't be destroyed. But people can.

[Copse]

(The Doctor, Jo and the Brigadier arrive. Yates is bloodied but unbowed.)
JO: Mike, are you all right?
BRIGADIER: Now, you take it easy, Mike. You've finished work for the day.
YATES: Sir, I
BRIGADIER: An ambulance is on its way.
DOCTOR: Jo, can you spare me a moment?
YATES: Sorry about the Tardis, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Oh, don't worry, Captain. We'll soon have her on her feet again.
(A few soldiers are using the farmer's tractor and ropes to try and get the Tardis upright. The Doctor takes Jo to Bessie and hands her the time detector.)
DOCTOR: Right, Jo, I want you to keep a close eye on this. As soon as you see the slightest reaction, you let me know.
JO: Right.
FARMER: One, two, six, heave! One, two, six, heave! Pull!

[Hyde's apartment]

BENTON: Sir, I'll stand by. And I'm glad you're all okay, sir. We'd really thought you'd copped it. Greyhound
HYDE: It's a daft idea anyway. I've had one basinful and I don't feel much like walking into another. You heard what the Doctor said.
RUTH: You know, Stuart, for a so-called member of the dominant sex, you are being remarkable feeble.
BENTON: Hey, hey! Is this a private fight or can anyone join in?
RUTH: Boadicea here only wants to creep over to the lab and knobble the Master.
BENTON: Well, supposing the time field's still working?
HYDE: Exactly.
RUTH: Well we shan't know that till we try it, now shall we.
BENTON: Right then. What are we waiting for?
RUTH: Right!
HYDE: Oy, you're worse than she is.
BENTON: Oh, you're suggesting we just sit here and let the Master treat us as a load of twits, I suppose?
HYDE: Look, mate, you're paid to play the James Bond games. I'm a scientist.
RUTH: Stuart, really.
HYDE: Don't you start. You'd be the first to clobber me if I muck things up.
RUTH: Well, you might at least have a go. Oh, why are you men so spineless?
HYDE: Lovey, I'm not men. I'm Stuart Hyde, registered, card carrying, paid up coward. For Pete's sake, what are you looking at me like that for? All right, I'll come.
BENTON: Thanks, Stuart.
RUTH: Jolly good, Stu. I knew you wouldn't let us down.
HYDE: Just give me time, that's all. Well, come on then. What are we waiting for?
(Hyde picks up a large spanner.)
BENTON: Let's go.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

MASTER: Come, Krasis. We have work to do.
(The Master takes the module containing the crystal into his Tardis.)

[The Master's Tardis]

(And places it on a smoked glass table.)
KRASIS: Master, what is this place? Is it a temple?
MASTER: Do not let it concern you, Krasis.
KRASIS: So vast a space inside so small a box.
MASTER: My power is greater than your imagination can encompass. You just remember that. Your only interest at the moment is to realise that Atlantis awaits us. Now, test the power levels. Good. Just a few minutes re-cycling and we shall be ready to leave.
(The Master leaves his time rotor blinking.)

[Copse]

JO: I'm getting a reading.
DOCTOR: It's very low.
JO: Mmm, it's fading again.
DOCTOR: He must be testing before take off. The power drain would have been enormous. Brigadier?
BRIGADIER: Yes, Doctor?
DOCTOR: The Master seems to be on the move again.
BRIGADIER: Right, Sergeant, get the Doctor's machine loaded up.
DOCTOR: No, no, there's no time for that now. I'll have to take the Tardis off from down there. I'll use the time sensor as a homing device and put my Tardis inside his. Then wherever he goes, I'll go with him.
(The Doctor and Jo go down into the crater, which has vehicle wheels scattered around.)
DOCTOR: Well, goodbye, Lethbridge Stewart.
BRIGADIER: Bye.
DOCTOR: I'll make contact as soon as possible.
JO: We'll make contact as soon as possible.
DOCTOR: We?
JO: We.
DOCTOR: Nothing I can say to dissuade you?
JO: No.
DOCTOR: Oh.

[Tardis]

JO: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yeah?
JO: The Tardis looks different.
(The old roundels have been replaced by large plastic dishes.)
DOCTOR: Oh, just a spot of redecoration, that's all. Now, Jo, you realise that what I'm about to do is going to be appallingly dangerous.
JO: I've been in the Tardis with you before.
DOCTOR: All right, but you've been warned.
JO: Shall I take your coat?
DOCTOR: Thank you. Right. Now then, come over here and look at this.
JO: Yeah, I'm coming.
DOCTOR: Now, the two Tardis's are operating on the same frequency, you see? Now here comes the tricky part. You see this?
JO: Yeah.
DOCTOR: This is the time setting. Now it's critical to a billionth part of a nanosecond, do you see?
JO: Yeah.
DOCTOR: Now hold this. (the time detector) If it's infinitesimally low, we'll miss it entirely and goes whistling off to heaven knows where. But if it's too high, even by a fraction of a moment, whumph! Time ram.
JO: Time ram?
DOCTOR: Yes. You see, the atoms making up this Tardis would occupy precisely the same space and time as the atoms making up the Master's Tardis.
JO: But that's impossible!
DOCTOR: Yes, well of course it is. So what do you think would happen?
JO: Whumph!
DOCTOR: Yes, exactly. Extinction. Utter annihilation. Now do you still want to come?
JO: It is my job, remember?
DOCTOR: Glad to have you aboard, Miss Grant.
JO: Glad to be aboard, Doctor!

[Copse]

(The Tardis dematerialises. The soldiers don't bat an eyelid.)
FARMER: Londoners!
(Meanwhile, back at the Institute, Benton, Ruth and Stuart run through the shrubbery and into a rhododendron bush near the laboratory block.)

[Tardis]

(The Doctor checks the console readings.)
DOCTOR: Ah ha. Yes. Yes, so far, so good.
JO: How long's it going to take us to get there?
DOCTOR: Well, that's the curious thing. No time at all. We're outside time. Of course, it always seems to take a long time but that depends upon the mood, I suppose.
JO: What, your mood?
DOCTOR: No, no, no, hers. No, the Tardis's.
JO: You talk as if she was alive.
DOCTOR: It depends what you mean by alive, doesn't it. You take old Bessie, for instance. Right, coming in to land now, Jo.
(The Tardis materialises with a jerk.)
DOCTOR: Steady.
(A large mainframe computer is inside the console room.)
JO: Look!
DOCTOR: Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. Still, that was always on the cards. I suppose.
JO: His Tardis is inside ours instead of, well, the other way round.
DOCTOR: Yes, quite. Very curious effect that. I wonder how it happened? Jo, switch on the monitor, will you? Let's see where we are.
(One of the new roundels lights up red.)
DOCTOR: Well, that's strange. No, of course. We're seeing through the TOM-TIT gap into the time vortex. Jo, you wait right here.

[The Master's Tardis]

(The Doctor walks out of the police box.)
DOCTOR: Good grief. Jo, come out here a moment, will you?
JO: I don't get it.
DOCTOR: No? Follow me.
(The Doctor opens the doors and walks into)

[Tardis]

JO: I still don't get it.
DOCTOR: Well, it's perfectly simple, Jo. My Tardis is inside the Master's.
JO: Yes, but his is inside yours.
DOCTOR: Exactly. They're both inside each other. Yeah, I should have suspected that.
JO: Well, what are we going to do now?
DOCTOR: Three guesses?
JO: Er, I wonder. Wait?
DOCTOR: Right first time!

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Master is noting down readings on a clipboard while Krasis paces, then looks out the window.)
KRASIS: Master!
(Two UNIT vehicles arrive.)
KRASIS: Alien wagons!
MASTER: I'll soon fix them.
(The Master starts up TOM-TIT.)

[Outside the Institute]

BRIGADIER: Right. B squad round the block. Keep your eyes open
(But the last two words take an age to say, as time slows to a near stop.)

[Newton Institute laboratory]

MASTER: There. That'll keep them nicely unoccupied for the time being. Right, Krasis, in you go.
KRASIS: Where?
MASTER: Into the Tardis, man, and hurry up.
(Ruth and Stuart enter.)
MASTER: Right, they won't stop me now.
RUTH: I'm sorry, Professor, but that's where you're wrong.
(Benton has presumably come in through the back window, and has his pistol pointed at the Master.)
MASTER: Well, well, my devoted assistants. And are you going to stop me?
RUTH: Not by ourselves, no. Take a look behind you.
MASTER: Oh, come on, really.
BENTON: You suit yourself, mate, but let's just have those hands up in the air, shall we?
MASTER: I should have disposed of you while I had the chance.
BENTON: Yes, well, you'll never have a better one. Stu, see if he's got a gun.
(Stuart puts his spanner down on TOM-TIT and gets between Benton and the Master. The Master pushes him at Benton.)
BENTON: Stuart, look out!
HYDE: Oh no! (The Master dashes into his Tardis.)

[The Master's Tardis]

(The Tardis doors close.)
KRASIS: Master! The other one is here. Your enemy is here.
MASTER: Good! Ha ha! Now I've got him really trapped.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(The Master's Tardis dematerialises.)
HYDE: What the?

[Tardis]

(The Tardis is tilted and shaking.)
JO: What's happening, Doctor?
DOCTOR: We're on our way, Jo. The Master's taken off for Atlantis.
JO: She's never behaved like this before.
DOCTOR: It's because the Tardis is operating out of phase, that's why.
(The Doctor adjusts a few controls and the flight smoothes out.)
DOCTOR: That's calmed her down a bit. She's very temperamental when she's roused, isn't she.
JO: You know, I never know whether you're joking or not, I, Ow. Oh, I think I've bruised my tailbone.
DOCTOR: Sorry about your coccyx, Jo, but these little things are sent to try us.
JO: My what?
DOCTOR: Coccyx. Your tailbone.
MASTER [on scanner]: I'm sorry about your coccyx too, Miss Grant. How very sociable of you both to drop in.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

BENTON: Well, I don't think we should touch it.
RUTH: Why ever not?
BENTON: Well, the Doctor was going after his Tardis, right?
RUTH: Right.
BENTON: Well, that thing there is a sort of time machine, isn't it?
RUTH: So what?
BENTON: So we'd better leave well alone.
RUTH: You're in command, Sergeant Benton.
BENTON: Yes.
HYDE: And a right foul up you made of it, too.
RUTH: Well, not exactly his fault.
HYDE: Well, don't look at me. You can't say I didn't warn you, now can you?
BENTON: Oh well, I'll listen to you next time. That was the closest I'll ever come to catching the Master, that was.
HYDE: Oh, come on now. It's not the end of the world, now is it?
BENTON: Isn't it? Well, the Doctor seems to think it might be. And the Master. Well, there's no telling where he is by now, is there? Or when he is, for that matter.
RUTH: Oh, for pity's sake. Look, you two make me sick. Standing about moaning like a couple of old women.
HYDE: Old women?
RUTH: Look, I mean it, Stu. Well, okay, he's gone off somewhere. So he's gone off. Whether he's gone into the past or the future
BENTON: All I know is we
RUTH: I don't know and, frankly, I don't care. The point is that we are here and now. Now, what we've got to do is to define the problem
BENTON: That's all very well, Miss Ingram, but I
HYDE: Stop right there, Professor. The problem's defined. Come and have a look.
(Hyde has spotted the near stationary UNIT troops.)
BENTON: It's the Brigadier.
RUTH: Exactly the same as before.
HYDE: How can it be the same as before now that the crystal's gone?
RUTH: I think I remember the Doctor said it works independently, even without the crystal.
BENTON: Yes, but do you realise we're still trapped, inside.
RUTH: Now will you let me turn off the transmitter?
BENTON: Well, I don't think we ought to.
HYDE: Well, perhaps we could get out through the back. It may not work all the way round.
RUTH: I'll bet it does. How do you propose finding out? I mean, once you're stuck, you're stuck.
BENTON: Yes, and only the Doctor can get you out.
RUTH: Well?
BENTON: All right, Doctor Ingram. Switch it off.
RUTH: Ah ha! A man of decision. (Ruth switches off TOM-TIT.)
BENTON: Go on then, switch it off.
RUTH: But I have.
HYDE: They're still stuck.
RUTH: But that's impossible!
HYDE: Well, you'd better explain to them, lovey. They still think they're stuck, apparently.
BENTON: Yes, and we're still trapped in here.

[Tardis]

MASTER [on scanner]: What can I do for you, Doctor? Or, er, is your visit purely social?
DOCTOR: Well, I thought we might have a little chat.
MASTER [on scanner]: What an excellent idea. Why not join me out here?

[The Master's Tardis]

DOCTOR [on scanner]: One step outside my Tardis and that would be the end of me, wouldn't it?
MASTER: You have a very poor opinion of me, don't you, Doctor.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: You've noticed. Well, well, well.
MASTER: It might be of interest for you to know that, er, I've put a time lock on your Tardis. You cannot leave. Unless I lift it, of course.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Do you think that I haven't thought of that too? You're as trapped as I am. You couldn't even open that door of yours unless I wish it.
MASTER: Alternatively, I could fling you out into the time vortex now. I doubt whether you could do that to me, so be very, very careful, Doctor.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Do you really think I care what happens to me at the moment? Don't you realise that your plans could ru
(The Master turns the sound off.)
MASTER: You know, he has an excellent brain, that man, though a little pedestrian. But, oh dear, what a bore the fellow is.
KRASIS: But is he dangerous?
MASTER: He's dangerous enough. But don't worry. I can handle him.
KRASIS: But you said he was in there! You told me he was safe in there!
MASTER: Once he realises that he's talking to himself, he'll be out here like a shot. Ah! He's realised it at last. That took a long time, the slow witted fool. Now you watch. He cannot bear not to have the last word.

[Tardis]

DOCTOR: He's not even listening. He's turned the sound off.
JO: Well, that's not very nice, is it?
DOCTOR: We've got to make him listen. It's our only chance of stopping him.
JO: You're not thinking of going out there, are you?
DOCTOR: No, not if I can help it.
JO: Well, what are you going to do then?
(The Doctor pulls a module from underneath the console.)
DOCTOR: If he's turned his sound receiver off, I must make myself heard without it.
(The Doctor swaps components around in the module.)
DOCTOR: If the thraskin puts his fingers in his ears, it is polite to shout. That's an old Venusian proverb.
JO: What's a thraskin?
DOCTOR: Thraskin? Oh, it's an archaic word, seldom used since the twenty fifth dynasty, the modern equivalent is plinge.
JO: What does plinge mean?
DOCTOR: Oh, for heaven's sake, Jo, I've just told you. It means thraskin.
JO: Oh, of course.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(Ruth is changing around circuit boards from TOM-TIT.)
BENTON: But why? I mean, if you turned it on, the Brig and company should have speeded up again. Why didn't they?
RUTH: Well, I don't know but it looks as if TOM-TIT has made a permanent gap in the structure of time. Our only hope is to close the gap up.
HYDE: So what are you doing?
RUTH: Well, I'm turning the circuits upside down, so to speak. Well, it's empirical, but you never know.
BENTON: Empirical?
RUTH: That, Sergeant Benton, means that I haven't got a clue what I'm doing.
HYDE: Join the club.
BENTON: So, it's just trial and error? Have a go and see what happens?
RUTH: Yeah, more or less. Right, Stu, you monitor the interstitial activity.
HYDE: Okay.
RUTH: If you get a reading over six oh give us a shout.
HYDE: And what's the upper limit?
RUTH: If it gets to seven oh, say a quick prayer and duck.
BENTON: Well, what about me?
RUTH: You just stand there and look pretty. Right, Stu, are you happy?
BENTON: Ecstatic.
RUTH: Okay then, let's have a stab at it.
HYDE: Interstitial activity, nil.
RUTH: Molecular structure stable. Increasing power.
HYDE: Two five, three oh, three five, four oh.
RUTH: How's the time reg?
HYDE: Er, steady on zero zero four.
RUTH: Right. Isolate matrix scanner.
HYDE: Check. Four five, five oh.
RUTH: Interstitial activity.
HYDE: Shooting up! Five five, six oh, six five, seven oh.
(Something happens to Benton. He seems to go dark, then collapses.)
RUTH: Can't hold! It's running away again! Start decreasing power.
HYDE: Seven five, seven oh, six five, six oh, five five, five oh, four five, four oh, three five, three oh.
RUTH: Right, that should be enough. I think the level should be okay now.
HYDE: Quite okay, I'd say.
RUTH: Right, now let's have a look at it.
(The soldiers are still stationary.)
RUTH: It's made no difference. They're still stuck.
HYDE: There we were, the skin of a gnat's whisker from the big bang and
RUTH: And nothing happened at all.
HYDE: Nothing?
(A baby boy is sitting on the floor, about to burst into tears.)

[The Master's Tardis]

(The Master and Krasis watch the Doctor on the scanner.)
KRASIS: Master, what is he doing?
MASTER: The same as I would in his position.
KRASIS: And what is that?
MASTER: Wait and see, Krasis. Wait and see.
KRASIS: And what are you going to do, Master?
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Testing, testing, testing. One, two, three, four, five, testing.
JO [on scanner]: He can hear you.
MASTER: I thought as much.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Yes, and he can't turn me off, can you? You've got to listen to me now.
MASTER: Have I?
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Obviously, you've not as yet been able to bring Kronos through, otherwise you wouldn't be going to Atlantis, so perhaps there's still time to make you realise the folly of your

[Tardis]

DOCTOR: Inyups senupwat. Neas nees nig datdat sig. Ilshnimuwat ijnilguin nyup nyp
MASTER [on scanner]: I'm sorry, Doctor. What was that again?
DOCTOR: Il shneel nukcusnok drashtarnik dag. Of all the low, underhanded tricks!
JO: What language was that?
DOCTOR: English.
JO: English?
DOCTOR: Yes, but backwards.
JO: I just don't get it.
DOCTOR: Well, he's picking up my words even before I've spoken them and feeding them back to me through the Tardis's telepathic circuits, making them come out backwards.
JO: The Tardis's are telepathic?
DOCTOR: Yes, of course. How else do you think they communicate? Well, that decides it. I've got no option. Now listen to me, Jo. When I go out there, I want you to
JO: You're not going out there.
DOCTOR: What else can I do?
JO: Doctor, you said yourself it would be suicide to go out there without the protection of the Tardis!
DOCTOR: Well, I've got to risk it. He's got to be stopped, but that's no reason to put you into any danger. Now once I go out of that door, I want you to close it, all right?
JO: But that means you'll be locked out!
DOCTOR: Yes, and you'll be safely locked in. Now, you're not to open that door for anybody or anything until I say so.
JO: I won't do it. I will not do it!
DOCTOR: Jo, you'll do as you're told! It's your job, remember?
JO: Doctor, if anything happens to you, I
DOCTOR: Yes, I know, Jo, I know. Now go and open that door.

[The Master's Tardis]

(The Doctor enters.)
MASTER: There you are, Krasis. What did I tell you?
DOCTOR: Won't you introduce me?
KRASIS: I am Krasis, High Priest of the temple of Poseidon.
DOCTOR: Greetings to you, Krasis. Any friend of the Master's is an enemy of mine.
MASTER: Oh come, Doctor, must we play games? I take it you have something to say to me before I destroy you?
DOCTOR: Yes, I most certainly have.

[Tardis]

MASTER [on scanner]: Your usual song of death and disaster? I do wish you'd learn a new tune.

[The Master's Tardis]

DOCTOR: You're risking the total destruction of the entire cosmos.
MASTER: Of course I am. All or nothing, literally! What a glorious alternative!
DOCTOR: You're mad! Paranoid!
MASTER: Who isn't? The only difference is that I'm a little more honest than the rest. Goodbye, Doctor!
(The Master switches on the crystal.)
KRASIS: No, Master, no!
(The white figure starts to appear.)
MASTER: Behold, Kronos, a rare and delicate feast for you. A Time Lord! Devour him!
(Kronos envelops the Doctor.)

[Tardis]

JO: Doctor!
(Jo faints.)

[The Master's Tardis]

(The Master holds the seal.)
MASTER: Kronos, be at peace! I command you, be at peace!
(Kronos goes back into the crystal.)
MASTER: Your work is nearly done, for now. You see, Krasis? Kronos is my slave.
(The Master notices Jo getting up on the scanner.)
MASTER: Miss Grant?
JO [on scanner]: What's happened to the Doctor? You must help him!
MASTER: Ah, he's beyond my help, my dear. He's beyond anybody's help.
JO [on scanner]: You mean that thing, that, that creature really swallowed him up?
MASTER: Ah, that's a nice point. Yes and no. Yes, it engulfed him. No, it didn't actually eat him up. He's out there in the time vortex and there he's going to stay.
JO [on scanner]: Then he is alive?
MASTER: Well, if you can call it that. Alive for ever in an eternity of nothingness. To coin a phrase, a living death.
JO [on scanner]: That that's the most cruel, the most wicked thing I ever heard.
MASTER: Thank you, my dear. Now, what are we going to do about you, though? You're an embarrassment to me. As indeed is that antiquated piece of junk of the Doctor's. Now let me see
JO [on scanner]: I don't really care anymore. Do what you like, but just get it over with.
MASTER: Your word is my command. Goodbye, Miss Grant!
(The two Tardises move in and out of each other in the vortex. On the scanner, Jo's image sways then blurs as the two time machines finally separate.)

Episode Five

[Tardis]

(Jo wakes to the sound of whispers.)
JO: Doctor.
DOCTOR [OC]: Jo. Jo, are you in there?
JO: Doctor? Oh, it is you.
DOCTOR [OC]: Thank heavens you're alive.
JO: Oh, I'm so happy. Where are you?
DOCTOR [OC]: I'm nowhere, Jo. I'm still in the time vortex. The Tardis is relaying my thoughts to you.
JO: What are all those other voices I can hear?
DOCTOR [OC]: What other voices? Oh. Oh, those are my subconscious thoughts. But I shouldn't listen to them too hard if I were you. I'm not all that proud of some of them.
JO: But I still don't understand? But you must be somewhere. Tell me how I can get you back?
DOCTOR [OC]: Oh, you can't, Jo, but luckily the Tardis can. That's why she's put us in touch.
JO: But what do you? I mean, what does she want me to do?
DOCTOR [OC]: Well, go to control panel number three.
JO: Okay.
DOCTOR [OC]: Now, lift the little lid marked Extreme Emergency.
JO: Right.
DOCTOR [OC]: The one with the red handle inside?
JO: Mmm hm.
DOCTOR [OC]: All right, Jo. Pull it.
(Jo pulls the handle straight up. There is a brief materialisation sound then the whispers stop and the Doctor is sitting on the floor.)
DOCTOR: Hello, Jo.
JO: Doctor!

[Atlantis plaza]

(Three important buildings open onto a raised dais at one end of the open space. Two trumpeters blow large curved brass horns. The great and the good have been gathered here for something special.)
ATLANTEAN 1: Open the doors!
ATLANTEAN 2: Open the doors!
(Dalios leaves his palace and goes to sit on a throne on a raised dais. A woman is carried in on a litter borne by Nubian slaves. A priest thumps his staff on the ground three times.)
CRITO: Peace, my brothers. His holiness, the most venerable priest of Poseidon, King of the Ten Kings, will hear his council.
HIPPIAS: My lord, your holiness, most venerable priest of
DALIOS: Yes, yes, yes, I hear you, friend.
HIPPIAS: Lord, may I speak plainly?
DALIOS: It would grieve me to think you would ever speak otherwise. Speak as a friend should speak.
HIPPIAS: You are popular, Dalios. The people love you. Will their love fill their bellies in the winter when the granaries are empty?
DALIOS: Your words are plain indeed, Hippias. What would you have me do? Order the rain to fall?
HIPPIAS: Aye, Dalios, I would!
MISEUS: Hippias!
DALIOS: Have a care!
HIPPIAS: Indeed, I shall have a care! A care for the people of Atlantis. A care that foolish superstition, old wives tales, the fear of old men should not prevent our caring for them as our rank demands.
MISEUS: He speaks the truth, o King.
DALIOS: You know not what you ask.
HIPPIAS: Must I be plainer still? I know quite well! I ask for the blessings our forefathers once enjoyed. I ask for the divine power to be given back to the land, from which it was so cruelly stolen!

[The Master's Tardis]

(The machine is still in flight, and the Master is poring over a map.)
KRASIS: But, Master, why are we not in Atlantis?
MASTER: My dear Krasis, I must work out our landing coordinates as accurately as possible. You see, your people must realise immediately that I am the Master, that I come from the gods and that I am bringing Kronos back to them.
KRASIS: Where then will you arrive?
MASTER: Why smack in the middle of the temple, of course.

[Atlantis plaza]

(The council are all talking at once.)
DALIOS: Brothers, silence! Peace! Peace, I say. I shall speak plainly too. You ask for the blessings of the golden years. Yet there came a time when Atlantis grew to hate them. What would you have, Hippias? If you were master of Kronos, lord of time. Ten crops in one season? A surfeit of fishes? An ocean of wine? Then take the barren soil as well, the stinking piles of rotting meat, an idle drunken people. I tell you Kronos was a curse!
HIPPIAS: But Dalios, I
CRITO: Be silent! The King speaks!
DALIOS: I have seen a temple twice the size of this fall through a crack in the very bedrock of the earth. I have seen a city drowned, a land laid waste by fire, so listen to the fears of an old man. For I tell you, if Kronos came again, Atlantis would be doomed, destroyed, never to rise again!
(The woman, Queen Galleia, rises from her chair.)
GALLEIA: Dalios, listen. I hear strange music.
(A Tardis is materialising somewhere.)
GALLEIA: There it is again.
(In the lower right corner of the plaza, a mainframe computer appears.)
GALLEIA: Look!
DALIOS: Guards!
(The Master steps out of his Tardis and pushes a trident aside.)
DALIOS: Who are you?
MASTER: I am the Master. I come as an emissary from the gods.
DALIOS: Indeed? Any god in particular?
MASTER: Of course, why should you trust me.
(The Master snaps his fingers and Krasis comes out of the Tardis.)
CRITO: Krasis!
DALIOS: Krasis!
MASTER: Now do you believe me?
DALIOS: What do you want?
MASTER: To speak of the ancient mysteries. The secrets of the mighty Kronos.
DALIOS: You are brave indeed, o Master. An emissary from the gods? Brothers, should I listen to this man?
GALLEIA: He has the very bearing of a god himself.
MISEUS: He appeared from the heavens like Zeus.
DALIOS: I have seen many such tricks. Krasis?
KRASIS: Most venerable, I have seen him! I have seen the Mighty One!
DALIOS: You have seen Kronos? We must speak together privately. The council is at an end. Come, lady.
(Dalios leads Krasis and the Master to his palace. The Master pauses alongside Galleia, and bows.)
CRITO: The council is at an end. The king departs. Sound trumpets!
GALLEIA: He had the bearing of the gods.

[Tardis]

(The time detector is active.)
DOCTOR: There we are, Jo. On our way to Atlantis.
JO: But you can't just take the Tardis wherever you want, can you? I mean, you haven't even managed to fix it yet? Or have you?
DOCTOR: No, not entirely, but the time sensor will lead us to where the Master's Tardis is.
JO: But not inside it?
DOCTOR: No, I hope not. Not this time. But we'll soon find out.

[Atlantis plaza]

HIPPIAS: But, Krasis, I beseech you. Please give me the chance
(Another materialisation sound echoes around the plaza. The police box parks herself next to the computer and the Doctor and Jo come out.)
DOCTOR: Well, well, well. Isn't it a small world.
KRASIS: You are still alive?
DOCTOR: Yes, so it would seem.
KRASIS: But not for long. Guards!
HIPPIAS: No! I forbid it! Are you mad? Who are these strangers?
KRASIS: They are the enemies of the Master, and therefore the enemies of our people and our land.
DOCTOR: We've come here to warn you that
KRASIS: Silence! You will regret this interference, Lord. Take them to the King!
GUARD: Come, this way.

[Dalios' terrace]

(The Master stands respectfully before the King.)
DALIOS: But if the high priest saw fit to break a scared trust, you think that good reason for the king to follow?
MASTER: Your high priest saw the crystal in my hands. He saw Kronos himself, saw him dominated by me. Krasis knows that I am the Master of Kronos.
(Galleia is hiding behind a column, listening.)
DALIOS: Krasis is but a slave at heart.
MASTER: Maybe, but he has come to learn that it is well to obey me.
DALIOS: You seek to make me fear you?
MASTER: Oh, not at all. But if you will but see, like Krasis, that I am indeed the Master of Kronos, then naturally you will obey me.
(The Master sits and looks into Dalios' eyes.)
MASTER: You will obey me. You will obey me!
DALIOS: A very elementary technique of fascination. I'm too old a fish, too old in years and in the hidden ways to be caught in such a net. You are no emissary from the gods.
MASTER: But you saw
DALIOS: Tell me, then. What of great Poseidon? What did he have for breakfast? Fish, I suppose? And what of Zeus and Hera? What is the latest gossip from Olympus? Do tell me.
MASTER: I underestimated you, Dalios.
DALIOS: I'm no child to play with such painted dolls. Kronos is no god, no titan. I know that and so do you.
MASTER: The king is old in wisdom.
DALIOS: Now you try to flatter me. You'll pull a string and want to see me dance. You shall not have the crystal.
MASTER: I shall go now. I have nothing more to say to you.
DALIOS: You have said nothing to me yet. When you find the true words to speak, I will listen.

[Palace]

(The Master goes into the building from the King's balcony.)
DOCTOR: Good afternoon. Now where have I seen that face before? Can't think of anything to say?
JO: How about curses, foiled again.
(The Master leaves with an escort.)
HIPPIAS: Come this way.

[Dalios' terrace]

(Galleia has returned to her own rooms to think.)
DALIOS: Strangers are uncommon in our land. Who are you?
DOCTOR: This is Jo, Jo Grant, your Majesty.
DALIOS: You are welcome, Jojo Grant. Surely as in ancient times, a goddess has descend from Olympus.
JO: But I'm not a goddess, Honestly, I'm not.
DALIOS: No, no, of course you're not, my child. Forgive the clumsy gallantry of an old man. I'm afraid I'm sadly out of practice. Hippias?
HIPPIAS: Lord?
DALIOS: Take the lady Jojo Grant to the Queen while I talk with this, er
JO: Oh, this is the Doctor.
DALIOS: This learned man.
HIPPIAS: This way, Lady.
DOCTOR: You'll be all right.
(Jo and Hippias leave.)
DALIOS: Forgive the roughness of your welcome. Hippias has all the delicacy of a red necked fisherman.
DOCTOR: Nevertheless, he did save our lives, your Majesty.
DALIOS: Indeed? He kept that to himself.

[Galleia's chambers]

(Galleia is having her hair arranged by a handmaiden.)
GALLEIA: But what did you think of him, Lakis?
LAKIS: He had the bearing of a god, Lady.
GALLEIA: My very thoughts. In fact, my very words. Are you teasing me, girl? Would you dare?
LAKIS: No, Lady, no.
GALLEIA: No, I hardly think you would. Are you frightened? I shan't be angered by your reply if it is an honest one.
LAKIS: I like the Lord Hippias better.
GALLEIA: A sweetmeat. A confection for a child's taste. I prefer this Master. He would not cloy upon the tongue as Hippias does.
LAKIS: He is a very handsome man, Lady.
GALLEIA: Handsome? Aye, he looked well enough. But his face, Lakis, it was a face of power. A man with such a face would dare risk the world to win his own desire. Hippias is but a boy. A petulant boy.
(Hippias enters.)
HIPPIAS: And a foolish one, no doubt, to trust a queen.
GALLEIA: Foolish, certainly, to think himself man enough to love a queen. No, Lakis, come back. The Lord Hippias is not staying.
HIPPIAS: The Lord Hippias would not be here at all, but he has been sent on an errand by the King.
GALLEIA: Then give me your message and go.
HIPPIAS: Lady? I did my best.
GALLEIA: He made you look a fool.
(Jo enters.)
HIPPIAS: Lady Galleia, may I present to you the lady Jojo Grant. The King bids you treat her as an honoured guest.
JO: How do you? Greetings.
GALLEIA: Greetings, Lady. You come from a far land?
JO: It couldn't be much further.
HIPPIAS: She and her companion fell from the skies, as did the Master.
GALLEIA: A day of wonders.
JO: You can say that again.
GALLEIA: Why should I say it again? Lakis? Show the Lady Jojo Grant
JO: Oh, it's just Jo, actually.
GALLEIA: Your pardon. Show the Lady Jo to a guest room, and give her attire more fitting to a lady of the court.
LAKIS: Yes, Lady.
JO: Thank you.
LAKIS: This way.
GALLEIA: And Lakis? Return quickly. I have an errand for you.
LAKIS: Yes, Lady.
(Lakis and Jo leave by an inner door.)
HIPPIAS: And none for me to run? A flower perhaps? A token of undying love to some lordling of the court? But no, it would be dead before it were delivered.
GALLEIA: You are impertinent! Remember, I am Galleia, Queen of Atlantis, daughter of kings and wife of Dalios. So, have a care.
HIPPIAS: Your pardon. I took you for another. I knew Galleia once, you see. The woman, not the queen. A sweet and loving lady. I took you for her. Please do forgive me.
GALLEIA: You may go.
HIPPIAS: I thank you, Lady.
(Hippias leaves.)
GALLEIA: Lakis? Lakis, come to me at once.
(Lakis enters.)
GALLEIA: Come closer. Go to the Lord Master, and when no one is near, say quietly to him only one word.
LAKIS: What word, Lady?
GALLEIA: Kronos.

[Dalios' terrace]

(Twilight.)
DALIOS: Kronos. Kronos. Kronos. I am the last alive who has known, who has seen, who remembers with a terror of twisted guts. And these fools would have me bring him back.
DOCTOR: Well, why didn't you destroy the crystal?
DALIOS: We tried and merely split the smaller crystal from it. It cannot be destroyed.
DOCTOR: Yes, of course. It's just like the Tardis. It has its being outside time and its appearance is here.
DALIOS: You are a philosopher, friend.
DOCTOR: Well, if wisdom is to seek the truth, I am, yes.
DALIOS: Then help me, Doctor. Help me to find a way to stop these evil men. Help me to save Atlantis from destruction.

[Galleia's chambers]

MASTER: Where is she?
LAKIS: If you will please wait, Lord.
MASTER: The Master waits for no one. I shall return when the Queen is ready to speak with me.
(Galleia enters, carrying a black cat.)
GALLEIA: Please stay. Lord, great Lord, be seated. The wine, Lakis.
(The Master remains standing. Lakis brings two goblets.)
GALLEIA: You may go. Minister to the needs of our guest.
(Lakis leaves. Galleia and the Master sit, and he looks into her eyes.)
MASTER: Lady Queen, you are beautiful.

[Palace guest room]

(Jo is now in Minoan dress and wig and admiring herself in a cheval mirror.)
JO: Wow, what a groovy dress. Do you reckon it'll get mum's approval?
LAKIS: Mum? Oh, you mean Queen Galleia?
JO: Yeah, guess so.
LAKIS: Mum.
JO: Anyway, let's go and give her a preview.
LAKIS: No, I'm sorry. She does not wish to be disturbed. The Lord Master is with her.
JO: Is he now?
LAKIS: They speak of the sacred mysteries.
JO: Kronos and all that bit?
LAKIS: It is forbidden.
JO: But that is what they're on about?
LAKIS: Yes.
JO: Right.
LAKIS: No, you mustn't go in. You mustn't!
JO: Look, I'll be quiet as a. Do they have mice in Atlantis?
LAKIS: Yes.
JO: Well, that's what I'll be as quiet as. An Atlantean mouse, okay?
(Jo opens the connecting door a little.)

[Galleia's chambers]

GALLEIA: You're a man who knows what he wants, Lord Master.
MASTER: And takes it.
GALLEIA: You want the crystal?
MASTER: I am going to possess it.
GALLEIA: Not without my consent.
MASTER: Of course not. But I am confident that you will give it.
GALLEIA: Why should I help you?
MASTER: For the sake of Atlantis, Lady. Would you not see her restored to her former glory? Rich, powerful, magnificent among the nations of the world? Who would not be ruler of such a country?
GALLEIA: Nothing must happen to Dalios.
MASTER: Why should it? He will rule for many years, the beloved sovereign of a beloved prosperous people.
GALLEIA: But surely you would want to
MASTER: Well, purely because of Lord Dalios' great age, it might be well if he were relieved of some of the more onerous duties of kingship. But the reins of power, Lady Queen, should be in stronger hands. Hands such as yours.
GALLEIA: And yours?
MASTER: It would be a pleasure to serve you. And then, when the end comes for Dalios, as it must come for all men, then perhaps?
GALLEIA: The crystal shall be yours.

[Palace guest room]

MASTER [OC]: Tell me. Where is it kept?

[Galleia's chambers]

GALLEIA: Deep in the earth. Beneath the temple. Dalios has the key. Oh, and Krasis has the key.
MASTER: Well then, Krasis will take me there. I'll speak with him immediately.
GALLEIA: I wish it were as simple as that. No one can get near, save Dalios himself. It's certain death to try.
MASTER: What is the danger?
GALLEIA: The guardian.

[Dalios' terrace]

(Night has fallen.)
DOCTOR: Yes, but who is the guardian?
DALIOS: A beast. A man. You can take your choice. Once he was my friend, a fellow councillor, a great athlete, and just as I longed for the wisdom the years alone could bring, so he craved great strength. The strength of the bull and a long life in which to use it.
DOCTOR: Well, it's a harmless enough ambition, I should have thought?
DALIOS: So should I. But Kronos in his blind sport gave him his desire. But not only the strength, the head of a bull. And so he has remained for the past five hundred years or more.
DOCTOR: He's the minotaur.
DALIOS: Please?
DOCTOR: It doesn't matter. Please go on.
DALIOS: Well, there's little more to tell. No one else shall suffer as he has suffered. Till the last day of his life, for which he longs so ardently, he will guard the crystal. No one can approach it. To try is certain death.

[Galleia's chambers]

MASTER: Would you like to volunteer, Krasis?
KRASIS: No, Lord, no!
GALLEIA: Very well then. We shall send one down who is mighty with the sword, and who longs with all his heart to seize the crystal. One whose death would be of little account.
KRASIS: But who, Lady?
GALLEIA: Hippias, of course.

[Palace guest room]

LAKIS: What can we do? What can we do?
JO: We'll tell the Doctor, that's what we can do. Now, take me to the King.
LAKIS: Oh, I dare not, Lady Jo.
JO: Would you rather let your precious Hippias face that creature?
LAKIS: Oh well, come quickly, then.

[Atlantis plaza]

(Lakis leads Jo across the plaza to the main door.)
LAKIS: This way.
GUARD: Halt!
JO: Take me to the King.
(Crito comes out of the palace.)
CRITO: The King is not to be disturbed.
JO: But I've got to see the Doctor! It's a matter of life and death!
CRITO: Indeed it is. Yours.
JO: Will you hear what I've got to say?
LAKIS: Come away.
(Lakis takes Jo away from the steps.)
JO: (sotto) What's the matter?
LAKIS: (sotto) Have a care. The Lord Crito is no friend to Hippias.
JO: (sotto) But
(Krasis and Hippias come out of another door.)
JO: Right, they're going now. I'll follow them. You try to get in and tell the Doctor, and the King for that matter. All right? Now take care.

[Temple of Poseidon]

(Krasis leads Hippias through to the altar and points the way to the undercroft. Hippias draws his sword and goes down the steps.)
JO: No!

[Temple undercroft]

(Jo sees Hippias go to the wooden door.)
JO: No, Hippias! Don't go in there!
(Krasis grabs Jo from behind and she is pushed through the door.)

[Temple Catacombs]

(Jo is shut in.)
JO: Open the door and let me out!
(Something roars.)

Episode Six

[Temple Catacombs]

(It is Dave Prowse wearing a bull's head.)

[Dalios' terrace]

(Lakis runs in.)
DALIOS: What is it?
CRITO [OC]: Come back!
LAKIS: Forgive me, Lord King, forgive me!
DALIOS: Tell us, child.
CRITO: Your pardon, Lord.
(Crito grabs Lakis and starts to drag her away.)
LAKIS: Lord Hippias and the High Priest have gone into the lair of the Guardian followed by the Lady Jo! DOCTOR: What?
(Jo and the Minotaur are playing hide and seek amongst the columns of the catacombs.)

[Temple undercroft]

(A guard has been placed on the door to the lair. The Doctor comes down the steps.)
KRASIS: Seize this intruder!
(The Doctor grabs the guard's trident and pins both him and Krasis against the wall.)
DOCTOR: Sorry to hold you up like this, Krasis, but I need that key.
(The Doctor snatches the key, breaks the trident over his knee and enters the catacombs. Krasis follows him.)

[Temple Catacombs]

(Jo runs up against a mirrored wall. The Minotaur is close behind her.)
DOCTOR: Jo? Jo? Jo? Jo, where are you?
(The Minotaur finds Jo, then Hippias intervenes waving a flaming torch.)
HIPPIAS: Stay back!
(The Minotaur walks towards Hippias, who throws the torch at it. The Minotaur easily picks up Hippias and throws him to the floor. Hippias jumps up and lies across the Minotaur's shoulders, from where he is lifted high and thrown through a mirror. The Doctor shouts something which is obscured by the sound of breaking glass, then holds his cape out.)
DOCTOR: Toro!
(The Minotaur charges the cape and the Doctor executes a neat veronica with his plaid capote. They repeat the move and as the Minotaur passes, the Doctor clubs it on the back of the neck. It falls, dazed, and the Doctor goes over to Jo.)
JO: Doctor, are you all right?
(The Minotaur charges again.)
DOCTOR: Look out, Jo!
(They stand aside and the Minotaur charges the mirrored wall, crashing through the blocks of masonry to reveal a hidden room, then dies.)

[Secret vault]

JO: Hippias! He saved my life.
DOCTOR: I'm afraid he's dead, Jo. The crystal! It's the crystal of Kronos!
(The three pronged crystal illuminates the decorated vault from its cauldron.)
DOCTOR: There you, Jo. That's what all the fuss has been about.
JO: It's beautiful, but at the same time, horrible. It gives me a funny feeling.
DOCTOR: Well, cheer up, Jo. Now that we've found the crystal, the Master's little game is at an end.
KRASIS: Not quite! The game is just beginning. A pity you will not live to see the end.
DOCTOR: That's where you're mistaken, Krasis. And if you value your own life, you will take me to see the King. Now!

[Dalios' terrace]

MASTER: But I am the King. Oh, didn't he tell you? Oh, he's a jolly fellow, our friend, Krasis. He loves a joke.
DOCTOR: Does he really?
MASTER: A complete success, our little palace revolution.
DOCTOR: What happened to King Dalios?
MASTER: Why, nothing.
DOCTOR: Then he's still alive?
(Galleia enters.)
MASTER: Why, certainly. And treated honourably.
GALLEIA: Even though Dalios is an old man, the King is still the King.
MASTER: And now it appears that I have to thank you both.
JO: What for?
MASTER: For giving me the crystal.
DOCTOR: You don't mean to say that you still intend going ahead with this
MASTER: Tomorrow you will both receive a suitable reward. An introduction to the mighty Kronos. And this time, Doctor, there will be no mistake.
DOCTOR: I wouldn't count on that.
(Guards take the Doctor and Jo away, followed by Krasis.)
MASTER: Right, Lady, I have a lot to do so you must leave me too.
GALLEIA: Must I indeed.
MASTER: You would question my decision?
GALLEIA: Perhaps. It depends what you mean to do.
MASTER: You must learn to obey, my love. To do my will. To carry out my commands without question, like a soldier.
GALLEIA: You mean like a servant girl? And you must learn, my love, that Galleia is a Queen.

[Palace dungeon]

(The Doctor and Jo sit on the floor, manacled to the wall.)
DOCTOR: Any luck?
JO: Funnily enough, they didn't include Atlantean chains in my escapology course. No, it's no good. Doctor, what are we going to do?
DOCTOR: Well, we'll just have to play it by ear, won't we.
JO: What happens if the Master wins?
DOCTOR: Well, the whole of creation is very delicately balanced in cosmic terms, Jo. If the Master opens the floodgates of Kronos' power, all order and all structure will be swept away, and nothing will be left but chaos.
JO: Makes it seem so pointless really, doesn't it.
DOCTOR: I felt like that once when I was young. It was the blackest day of my life.
JO: Why?
DOCTOR: Ah, well, that's another story. I'll tell you about it one day. The point is, that day was not only my blackest, it was also my best.
JO: Well, what do you mean?
DOCTOR: Well, when I was a little boy, we used to live in a house that was perched halfway up the top of a mountain. And behind our house, there sat under a tree an old man, a hermit, a monk. He'd lived under this tree for half his lifetime, so they said, and he'd learned the secret of life. So, when my black day came, I went and asked him to help me.
JO: And he told you the secret? Well, what was it?
DOCTOR: Well, I'm coming to that, Jo, in my own time. Ah, I'll never forget what it was like up there. All bleak and cold, it was. A few bare rocks with some weeds sprouting from them and some pathetic little patches of sludgy snow. It was just grey. Grey, grey, grey. Well, the tree the old man sat under, that was ancient and twisted and the old man himself was, he was as brittle and as dry as a leaf in the autumn.
JO: But what did he say?
DOCTOR: Nothing, not a word. He just sat there, silently, expressionless, and he listened whilst I poured out my troubles to him. I was too unhappy even for tears, I remember. And when I'd finished, he lifted a skeletal hand and he pointed. Do you know what he pointed at?
JO: No.
DOCTOR: A flower. One of those little weeds. Just like a daisy, it was. Well, I looked at it for a moment and suddenly I saw it through his eyes. It was simply glowing with life, like a perfectly cut jewel. And the colours? Well, the colours were deeper and richer than you could possibly imagine. Yes, that was the daisiest daisy I'd ever seen.
JO: And that was the secret of life? A daisy? Honestly, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Yes, I laughed too when I first heard it. So, later, I got up and I ran down that mountain and I found that the rocks weren't grey at all, but they were red, brown and purple and gold. And those pathetic little patches of sludgy snow, they were shining white. Shining white in the sunlight. You still frightened, Jo?
JO: No, not as much as I was.
DOCTOR: That's good. I'm sorry I brought you to Atlantis.
JO: I'm not.
DOCTOR: Thank you.
(The door opens.)
GUARD: Inside, old man!
DALIOS: I demand to be taken to the Lady Galleia!
GUARD: You'll do as you're told.
DALIOS: How dare you lay your hands on me! I shall see the Queen! Out of my way, slave!
(Dalios raises his hand and the guard hits him with his trident. Dalios falls and the guard locks the door again.)
DOCTOR: Dalios! Dalios!
DALIOS: Who would have thought it. My sweet Queen.
DOCTOR: Is the Master responsible for this?
DALIOS: Aye, but tis no matter. Come closer.
DOCTOR: What is it?
DALIOS: There's so little time. So little. I tell you the vision of a dying man. Atlantis was doomed. You are a true philosopher. The world must be, must be saved. And you are the one to do it. The only one. Who'd have thought it? My lovely Galleia.
(Dalios dies in Jo's lap.)
DOCTOR: Dalios! We won't fail you, Dalios.

[Atlantis plaza]

(Morning, and the council has been summoned. The surviving prisoners are fastened either side of the dais.)
CRITO: Silence! The Lady Galleia, Queen of Atlantis, now speaks.
GALLEIA: Brethren of the council, my faithful few. Our troubles are now at an end. No longer shall we fret beneath the hand of an old, defeated king. I shall present to you his holiness, the most venerable, Lord Master.
DOCTOR: Quite above himself, isn't he.
CRITO: Silence!
MASTER: Greetings to you, my brothers. I grieve to see the council is so small. And yet I rejoice that you, the few who have put me here, have come to claim your just reward. Today, you shall see the Mighty One himself. Kronos, the most terrible. Krasis, the high priest will assist me. Prepare, Krasis.
(The part of TOM-TIT that the Master brought from the lab, containing the fragment of crystal, is in the plaza. The larger crystal is with it. Krasis operates the device.)
DOCTOR: What happened to the rest of the council?
JO: Yes, where are they?
DOCTOR: Are they alive?
MASTER: The point is academic, Doctor. In a few moments, it'll be of no further interest to you.
DOCTOR: Then satisfy my curiosity now. Are they indeed alive, or are they dead like King Dalios?
GALLEIA: The King is unharmed.
DOCTOR: The King is dead, Madame.
JO: It's true. We were there when he died this morning.
GALLEIA: You were there? You saw him? Is this true? Is this true? Is the lord Dalios, your King, no longer alive? Answer me.
MASTER: He died this morning. He was an old man.
DOCTOR: And you were responsible for his death!
GUARD: Quiet!
GALLEIA: You promised.
MASTER: I promised you power, and you shall have it. Power to realise your most ambitious dreams!
GALLEIA: You promised he should not be harmed!
MASTER: He was an old man. And he was stubborn!
(Galleia slaps the Master.)
GALLEIA: Oh, you! Seize him! Seize him!
MASTER: Krasis, the switch!
DOCTOR: No, stop him! Stop him!
(Too late. The white creature appears in the plaza)
MASTER: Kronos! I, the Master, welcome you! I, the Master, bid you do my will! I command you to destroy these men! Obey me! I command you! I order you to obey!
(Kronos hovers over the plaza.)
DOCTOR: He'll never obey you. Don't you understand yet what you've done? He's uncontrollable!
MASTER: Obey!
(Lightning flashes and the buildings start to fall. People scream and the Master breaks free of the guards and runs over to grab the large crystal.)
DOCTOR: Jo! Jo, come back! Jo! Jo!
(The Master gets the large crystal just as Jo leaps onto his back. He carries her and the crystal into his Tardis.)
DOCTOR: Come back, Jo! Come back! Jo! Come back. 
(The Master's Tardis dematerialises. Galleia frees the Doctor, who runs into his own Tardis to follow. Kronos continues to shriek in the air above Atlantis.)

[The Master's Tardis]

(The Master handcuffs Jo to the console.)
MASTER: There, Miss Grant. I think we've seen the last of the Doctor. Buried for all time under the ruins of Atlantis. You know, I'm going to miss him.
JO: He's not finished. I just know it.
MASTER: Of course he is.
JO: No, you're the one who's finished! Do you think that, that creature out there will ever let you control it?
MASTER: I do so already. He came when I called. You saw that yourself.
JO: Like a tiger comes when he hears a lamb bleating.
MASTER: Nicely put, my dear. You know, that was worthy of the late lamented Doctor himself. You know, I could kick myself for not having polished him off long ago. Just think of the future. Dominion over all time and all space. Absolute power forever. And no Doctor to ruin things for me.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Don't worry, Jo.
JO: Doctor!
DOCTOR [on scanner]: I'll soon sort him out for you.
MASTER: Doctor! Why, you must be as indestructible as that wretched Tardis of yours! And how exactly do you propose to sort me out?
DOCTOR [on scanner]: By making you see reason, and making you destroy that crystal.
MASTER: Oh? Why should I? I have my Tardis, I have Kronos and I have Miss Grant. Now, my reason tells me that I hold all the cards.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Ah, but there's one card that you've forgotten.
MASTER: Oh?
DOCTOR [on scanner]: The trump card. I can stop you whenever I please.
MASTER: You are bluffing, Doctor.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Am I? How about time ram?
MASTER: Time ram? You couldn't do it in that old crock.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: The two Tardis's are operating on the same frequency, and our controls are locked together. See for yourself.
(A dial moves up from 70 towards the warning and danger zones.)
MASTER: Stop!
DOCTOR [on scanner]: You know what'll happen if that control goes over the safety limit, don't you. Tell him, Jo.
JO: The two Tardis's occupy exactly the same space and time, and that means that you go
MASTER: I know very well what it means.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Do you?
MASTER: Yes! Oblivion.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Top of the class. Extinction, total annihilation, for you, the Tardis and the crystal.
MASTER: And for you and Miss Grant.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Oh yes, of course. But by then, Kronos will be free, and the universe will be saved.
MASTER: Very well. Go ahead.
DOCTOR [on scanner]: What?
MASTER: Go ahead. Time ram!
JO: You can't be serious?
MASTER: Do you think I'm going to dance to the Doctor's tune like some performing poodle? Look, Doctor, you want to stop me? Try!
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Very well. Goodbye, Jo.
(The dial climbs to 94, just below the red.)
MASTER: Well? Why have you stopped?
DOCTOR [on scanner]: To give you one last chance.
MASTER: Nonsense! You can't bring yourself to destroy her. Now admit it! It's that fatal weakness of yours, Doctor. Pity, compassion. You know, for a moment there, you almost had me believing you.
JO: Don't listen to him, Doctor! Think of all those millions of people who'll die. Think of all those millions of people who'll never be born. Do it, Doctor, quickly!
DOCTOR [on scanner]: But Jo, there may be another way.
MASTER: Of course there is. The way to immeasurable glory! JO: Goodbye, Doctor!
(Jo reaches for the dial.)
MASTER: No!
DOCTOR [on scanner]: Don't do it!
JO: Too late!
MASTER: No!
(The time rotor turns into a bright light. The two Tardis's go quiet and hang in nothingness. Jo and the Master are out cold on the floor. She is no longer handcuffed to the console. Jo wakes first.)
JO: Doctor.
(Jo leaves the Master's Tardis and crosses the rainbow nothingness to the police box.)

[Tardis]

(The Doctor is lying on the floor.)
JO: Doctor? Doctor?
DOCTOR: Jo. Are you all right?
JO: I'm fine. Dead, of course, but I'm fine.
DOCTOR: Dead? What are you talking about? You're no more dead than I am.
JO: Well, that's just it. Well, I mean, that's what I mean. I mean, you're dead too, and so's the Master.
DOCTOR: And I suppose we're all in heaven?
JO: Yeah, or somewhere. Hey, come take a look. Come on.

[Nothingness]

JO: Groovy, isn't it?
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, it's fascinating, but somehow I don't think we're in heaven.
JO: Well, where are we then?
DOCTOR: Well, that's just it. I don't know myself. You shouldn't have put us into time ram, Jo. In any case, I was just about to do it myself.
JO: Oh, really?
DOCTOR: Now look, Jo, I. No, not really.
(Someone coughs. They turn to see a giant female face filling the space.)
DOCTOR: Greetings.
KRONOS: Your courtesy is always so punctilious, Doctor.
DOCTOR: You know me?
KRONOS: Of old.
DOCTOR: Well, you must forgive me, but I can't quite place you.
KRONOS: I am Kronos.
JO: You? But you're a girl.
KRONOS: Shapes mean nothing.
JO: But a little while ago you were a raging monster and an evil destroyer.
KRONOS: I can be all things. A destroyer, a healer, a creator. I'm beyond good and evil as you know it.
DOCTOR: Where exactly are we?
KRONOS: On the boundary of your reality and mine. You brought yourselves here.
DOCTOR: Yes, the time ram.
KRONOS: At the moment of impact, I was released. That saved you and took you to the threshold of being.
DOCTOR: Well, what now?
KRONOS: I owe you a debt of gratitude nothing could repay. What would you wish?
JO: To go home.
DOCTOR: In the Tardis.
KRONOS: You shall.
DOCTOR: Thank you.
JO: But what about the Master?
KRONOS: He stays.
JO: And what will happen to him?
KRONOS: Torment, of course. The pain he has given so freely will be returned to him, in full.
(The Master comes out of his computer.)
MASTER: No!
(The Master falls to his knees.)
MASTER: Doctor, please. Please help me. I can't bear it. Please, Doctor, please.
DOCTOR: Mighty Kronos, may I ask one last favour of you?
KRONOS: Name it.
DOCTOR: His life. His freedom.
KRONOS: He made a prisoner of me.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know. But would you allow us to deal with him in our way?
KRONOS: I do not understand you, but if that is your desire, so let it be.
MASTER: Thank you, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Don't thank me. You're coming back to Earth with us.
MASTER: Yes, of course.
(The Doctor turns and goes into the Tardis. The Master pushes Jo and runs back to his own.)
DOCTOR: No! No! Kronos, stop him! Stop him, Kronos!
(The Master's Tardis dematerialises.)
KRONOS: You asked for him to be given his freedom. He has it.
JO: Here we go again.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(Clad only in a nappy, the little boy refuses the food Hyde is trying to feed him with a spoon.)
HYDE: Come on, baby Benton. Come on, get it down you.
RUTH: What are you feeding him on now?
HYDE: The remains of my lunchtime sandwiches mashed up with some cold tea.
RUTH: Stop playing mothers and fathers and come and give me a hand. I think I'm nearly there.
HYDE: What are you trying to do?
RUTH: Well, if I'm on the beam, we should be able to close the gap in time for good. Right, switch on, Stu.
HYDE: Okay.

[Tardis]

JO: But, why? I mean, why did you even ask?
DOCTOR: Jo, would you condemn anybody to an eternity of torment? Even the Master?
JO: No. No, I guess I wouldn't.
DOCTOR: No. Well, neither would I. Even though he was responsible for the destruction of Atlantis.
JO: It's so terrible though, when you think about it. All those people.
DOCTOR: Yes. Right, Jo, we're about to land back in Cambridge. Just think. It all happened three thousand, five hundred years ago.

[Newton Institute laboratory]

(TOM-TIT is powering up.)
HYDE: Three oh, three five, four oh.
(The Tardis materialises where the Master's Tardis used to stand.)
HYDE: Suffering catfish!
RUTH: Increasing power.
HYDE: But Ruth, look!
RUTH: Yes, it must be the Doctor. Now concentrate, Stu. Increasing power.
(Jo and the Doctor come out of the Tardis.)
HYDE: Four five, five oh.
RUTH: Isolate matrix scanner.
HYDE: Five five. Check.
DOCTOR: What's going on here?
HYDE: Six oh, six five, seven oh.
RUTH: See if it's working, Stu.
(Outside, the soldiers begin to move.)
HYDE: Hey. Yes, it is.
RUTH: Good.
(TOM-TIT starts to smoke.)
DOCTOR: It seems to be working a bit too well.
RUTH: It's running away again.
HYDE: Ruth, everybody, get down. It's going to go up!
(Bang! and time outside returns to normal.)
JO: You'll just have to start right at the beginning again.
RUTH: No, I couldn't. Not without the Professor. Just as well, I guess.
DOCTOR: It's done its job. Everything's now back to normal.
(The Brigadier bursts in.)
BRIGADIER: Right, stand quite still, everyone. Er, where's the Master?
DOCTOR: A very good question, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: Doctor, glad to see you're back. Miss Grant, what on Earth are you doing in that extraordinary get-up? And where, for heaven's sake, is Sergeant Benton!
HYDE: The baby! We forgot the baby!
(Who is a baby no longer, but still undressed.)
BENTON: Would somebody please mind telling me exactly what's happening around here?

<Back to the episode listing

Doctor Who and related marks are trademarks of BBC . Copyright 1963, Present. The web pages on this site are for educational and entertainment purposes only. All other copyrights property of their respective holders.